(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"







• 



- 



: 



■ 







COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 




t>i!<j& 



MA 



&*?•&& 



&%%?<&**•&•' 




















■■" ■ ■ 




£a 1970 YEARBOOK 







"A'tite 





If 



R,E cunuiTHHF '. 



{ ;> -UUO. 

-^r- FURNITURE 




T 



L 












10 




I WJcmi'!; 









Za <, 



A 



i 







ill /ll 

ill WM 




s\ 



Mill Illlllllllllllliniill i»» in 1 '"" 1 ' 11 



illl 




IN MEMORIAM 

DR. DAVID RITTENBERG 

1906-1970 




We all know the teachers who have reached out and touched us in the past 
few years, and they have been very few indeed. Dr. Rittenberg was one of those 
teachers. We could only guess at his scientific accomplishments, but his genius for 
delighting the wit and inspiring the minds of his students was obvious to all who 
learned from him. 

Most of us have forgotten the tortuous pathways of our first Biochemistry lecture, 
but can still hear the Professor's closing remark: "Look, only one of you 126 guys 
is the stupidest person in the class." Those are still pretty good odds. 

My own personal recollections of Dr. Rittenberg, however, are dominated by 
the bacchanalian rout which occurred at his home above the palisades late in the 
Fall of 1966. One blustery evening after classes the majority of our seminar group 
bundled into the rear seat of the Professor's Volkswagen and roared off". Our first 
stop was a Palestinian bakery, where we purchased several loaves of hard, heavy 
bread baked in the shape of a frisbee. The Professor then disappeared into an un- 
marked and rather dilapidated storefront nearby, and emerged laden with several 
bottles of Greek wine, and enormous bag of "real Greek" black olives, and about a 
dozen of the fattest, blackest cigars I had ever seen. 

"You guys are really going to eat tonight," he predicted as we dodged traffic on 
the George Washington bridge. And we really did. The frisbees, it turned out, 
we broke into pieces and employed to devour a Middle Eastern version of Califor- 
nia dip. The meal itself, cooked by Dr. Rittenberg's good-natured and highly indul- 
gent wife, was stupendous. I still have a nice white shirt with two hand-sized wine 
stains on the front. 

But the coup de grace came post prandially. He led us into the drawing room, 
producing a bottle of ouzo, a vile and potent Greek liqueur, gave each of us one 
of the big black stogies, and settled back to hear what we had to say. I certainly 
don't remember much of our remarks, but I know that his interest and delight in 
having us in his home filled the room, and that whatever we said, he was listening 
to us. 

J. Madigan 



16 




17 



DEDICATION 




Harold W. Brown. B.A., Kalamazoo, 1924; M.S.. Kansas Stale, 1925; Sc.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 1928; M.D., Vanderbilt, 1933; Dr.P.H., Harvard, 1936; L.H.D. 
Kalamazoo, 1945; LL.D., Puerto Rico, 1954. 



"Come on in and sit down, Dave. What can I do for you?" 

"Dr. Brown, I'm happy to be the one to come and tell you that our class has 
selected you for the dedication of our yearbook." 

"Thank you ... I consider it a great honor." 

And Dr. Brown did consider it a great honor. He's that kind of man. He has 
traveled the world again and again, helped found medical schools in underdevel- 
oped jungle countries, been instrumental in the creation of numerous programs to 
bring medical care to the teeming masses, received countless medals and citations 
from grateful governments and people, and yet still feels genuinely honored when 
a group of students he has helped takes time out to express their thanks. 

Dr. Brown glanced briefly out the window at the world he understands and 
loves to share. He took a slow deep breath, and as he unhurriedly looked back 
toward me again, I settled back happily into my chair, knowing I was in for a 
treat. 



18 



BROWN ON TEACHING: There is nothing a physician in a medi- 
cal center ought to enjoy more than teaching . . . The priorities here 
should be teaching, then medical care, then research . . . The greatest 
product we have is 125 students each year . . . Every class has been 
good in my 26 years here . . . Money spent on any education is worth- 
while. 

BROWN ON STUDENTS: (regarding the student petition asking 
the administration to allow him to stay beyond retirement) With stu- 
dents behind you, you have the most powerful influence behind you in 
the medical center ... I don't agree with some of the ways they do 
things, but I'm in favor of student initiated change. 





BROWN ON PEOPLE: I feel very strongly about respect ... I always try 
to give others credit - the only important thing is getting the work done . . . 
The most important contribution we can make is to treat people as human 
beings. 

BROWN ON CHANGE: If you're right, you're going to win out in the 
end . I've been working with Orientals for over 13 years; they're in no 
hurry and I've learned to go at the pace that people are comfortable at . . . 
If our administration was fundamentally interested in teaching, changes 
would have been made long ago. 

BROWN ON HIMSELF: If everyone in this class finds their niche as I 
have, they will be happy ... I always felt I oi ~ht to be paying Columbia 
for letting me work here. 



As I sat listening I found it hard to separate 
my agreement with the aphorisms from my en- 
joyment of the man. His vehicle - the story; I'd 
heard most of them before, maybe a couple of 
times, but I found myself enthralled again. His 
knack like any good storyteller was not in the 
story, but in the telling. The reorganization of 
the Taiwan Medical School and the initial or- 
ganization of the Puerto Rico Medical School 
were told as sagas with bits of practical advice 
intermixed. And always there was the wry, 
tongue-in-cheek humor: "I see nothing wrong 
with a pass-fail system. If the students want it, 
fine. My comments will read: This student 
passed, he is an A student. Or, this student 
passed, he is a C student . . . Parasitology 
never has been very important around here. 
And it makes sense that a disease like hook- 
worm which affects only 700,000,000 people 
with a blood loss of 7,000,000 quarts daily 
would be considered lightly." 
This year is the last as chairman of the Para- 



sitology Department, but his mind is still active 
in planning. His plan for P&S is twofold: 

1) To set up a Department of Interna- 
tional Medicine with a major interest in 
the study of nutrition and population 
and a major goal of serving as a train- 
ing center and exchange depot for U.S. 
and foreign M.D.s interested in the two 
problems. His attitude for this Medical 
School: "Let's take on the world." 

2) To reorganize the delivery of medical 
care in this area with storefront clinics 
and self-insurance pre-payment pro- 
grams for employees and neighborhood 
residents. 

"Come back again, Dave, soon. We'll talk 
some more. My door is always open." 

I was leaving smiling and enriched once 
again. And very glad our dedication is to Dr. 
Brown . . . because his dedication is to us. 

S. David Lang 



19 



GEORGE A. PERERA 




20 



P&S. by any yardstick, is one of the world's leading schools of medicine. 
Although it ranks among the highest on such scales as size and scope, facilities, 
research productivity and its support, the endowment of students, and the repute 
of faculty, its tradition of excellence does not stem from bricks, mortar, decimal 
points or dollar signs. Rather, the secret of success of Columbia College of 
Physicians and Surgeons comes from emphasis on Who instead of What, its 
special emphasis with regard to the personal qualities and attitudes of its learners 
and teachers in addition to their scholarly characteristics and their pursuit of 
knowledge and of truth. 

The future of P&S is another matter. Throughout the nation, fingers are being 
pointed and voices are being raised, directed especially at medical schools and 
their related hospitals. There are widespread concerns about injustice and 
inequality, new challenges of professional authority, vociferous demands to 
provide the public with health care and access to it, and a clamor for more 
attention to be devoted to the prevention of disease, the maintenance of 
individual health, and to the obliteration of the poisons and evils which threaten 
the health of groups and of society. 

In the opinion of many, crisis is at hand already, a crisis in which you and we 
and P&S will be involved for some period to come. Matters will get worse before 
they get better. Manpower and means are stretched to the limit, the demands will 
impose even more load, and no single solution will solve the problems. 

Once again the answer, if we are to move ahead, must come from the qualities 
and attitudes of people, of physicians, of you and of us. To plan imaginatively, to 
develop more professional and allied health personnel, to experiment in new 
forms of delivery of health services, and to participate as fully as possible while 
not overdiluting our primary objectives, these call for the same attributes which 
we have sought for this school and which have made it what it is. 

Only through your integrity and sense of responsibility, only through your 
continued recognition of the need to work together, and only through your 
awareness that service and learning and the acquisition of new knowledge are 
intertwined rather than separate can we come through on top. Loyalty, trust, and 
team play are not meaningless words. Mixed with concern, artistry, imagination, 
and a smile, they are essential for survival. 

Even after your graduation as full-fledged physicians, know that our interest 
and affection will continue. But know also that we will need your support and that 
we hope you will need ours as mutual advocates of the role of P&S to medicine 
and of medicine to the nation's health. 



George A. Perera, M.D. 
Associate Dean 



21 













































1 





. j 



■■■/ 

► J 






METAMORPHOSIS 

his chair stiff, the light dim. winter's wind chilling his skin 

his mind is full of people 

he cares that Pete and David have left 

he dreams of caressing a breast whose nipple will rise 

he is a 1st year student 

he hears the cries of dogs I he cracks the skulls of mice 
he hears the cries of cats/ he scalps the skull of man 

he sees woman's husband draw his last breath 

then practices needling his 2nd ICS 
he sees woman's husband sip his last drink 

then washes his liver in a path-lab sink 
he attends both funerals; then he is warned 

". . . you must not get involved with your patients" 

he stabs steel into veins/into bones/ into spine 

he tears off gauze scab from nerve-raw red wounds 

his chair stiff, the light dim, winter's wind chilling his skin 

his mind is full of facts 

he cares about his internship 

he dreams of touching a breast and feeling no lumps 

he is a 4th year student 

E. G. Howe, III 



23 



I 



•v-:-* 




fmm 



£T< 



7 







*. 



Class Of 1970 . . . 




Whatever will be, is. 



PETER CAREY ALBRO 



•'•M 




x\ 



TOMAS STEPHEN B/ 



J5l liST 





KENNETH GEORGE BENOIT 



MICHAEL DEAN BERGER 




WILLIAM LESLIE BERGMAN 







HOWARD LAWRENCE BLANK 




JOHN ROBERT BOGDASARIAN 





JAMES BORDLEY, IV 



RICHARD CHARLES BOUCHER 



ARTHUR STUART BROWN 





GEORGE CLIFFORD BROWN 



FREDERICK MILTON BRUNN. JR. 





STEVEN CLYDE BUCHANAN 



PETER PAUL BUDETTI 





JOHN MALLORY BURKS 



DAVID A. BURTON 




fl 




RICHARD GUNNAR CARLSON 



DANIEL HERBERT CARMICHAEL 




DENNIS ANTHONY CARSON 




PAUL CHANG 



ii mil 

in m«» 

II mis 
II mm 

II MM 
II IMM 

M M 




DAVID CHANDLER CHARLESWORTH 



m 



\u*.\ 





JAMES ZUBOW CINBERG 



STEPHEN ADAMS COLE 




ROBERT LAWSON COMBS 





DAVID MICHAEL CORCORAN 



ALAN WHITTEMORE CROSS 





PHILEMON DICKINSON 



RUSSELL STEPHEN DILLEY 





GEORGE PETER DINGELDEIN, JR. 



JOHN LOUIS ESPOSITO 





RONALD BARRY FAUER 



GARY NEAL FOULKS 




NEIL FRANKLIN GOODMAN GEOFFREY MASON GRATWICK HARRY BERNARD GREENBERG 




MATTHEW JOEL GUY 



WILLIAM LAWRENCE HAZARD 



KAREN KRAMER HEIN 





CHARLES VERNON HELMING 



I. CRAIG HENDERSON 





PAUL ROBERT HICKEY 



JOHN PHILIP HOCHE 





PETER L. HOFMANN 



EDMUND GRANT HOWE, III 






EDWARD CLYDE JONES 



SALLY J. KASPAREK 



RICHARD JOEL KATES 




STEVE KOHL 



GRETCHEN BLAIR KRONENBERG HENRY MORRIS KRONENBERG 




ARTHUR ROY LIBERMAN 



STEPHEN BROOK LICHTENBERG 






A 




DIANE LIPSON 



DANNE ROY LORIEO 




WALTER B. LUNDBERG 





WILLIAM R. McFARLANE, JR. 



JONATHAN CLARK McMATH 



JOHN CALLANAN MADIGAT^, J 




PETER HATT MOYER 





HAROLD HOL: 



MICHAEL FRANK PARRY 



m ■ 




THOMAS HOLDEN PATTERSON 




ANTHONY JOHN PEPE 

■ 






PHILLIP KEITH PETERSON 



MARTHA MONSON PROVINE 





DONALD OLIVER QUEST 



WILLIAM HENRY RAMSEY 





CAROL ANN RAVIOLA 



THOMAS AUDET RICE 





WILLIAM WADDLE RICHARDSON, JR. 



HP 

CAROLINE ARMISTEAD RIELY 






JOHN STEPHEN RODMAN 



RONALD NEIL ROTHENBERG 





KAREN ANN SARNOFF 



BERNARD PINSKER SCHACHTEL 






ROBERT MILTON SCHMIDT 



E. BALDWIN SELF, JR. 



STEPHEN QUENTIN SHAFER 






MARK IRWIN SINGER 



SAMUEL GIDDING SIRIS 



RICHARD MARC SPIEGEL 





JUDITH McCONNELL SONDHEIMER HENRY MELVILLE SONDHEIMER 




ALAN JEFFREY SPOTNITZ 





GORDON ALAN STARKEBAUM 



WILLIAM AUSTIN TANSEY. Ill 




MICHAEL L. TAPPER 



JAMES LANE TAYLOR 







0* 



% 



I V 



ALAN DOUGLAS TICE 





RICHARD STEVEN TINDALL 



RONALD WALLACH 




CANDACE COOPER WALWORTH 







& 







EDWARD ZINSSER WALWORTH 








OLIN LESLIE WEST, III 



^^ 




ANTHONY DUNSTER WHITTEMORE 




MARK AUSTIN WIGHTMAN 





THOMAS MARK WOODCOCK 



KEITH ALLEN WRIGLEY, JR. 




ANDREW WALTER ZIMMERMAN 




The P&S Experience . . . 




Stern mistress, we come to thee 

As supplicants. Open your iron portals to us 
Gently, for we are frail of knowledge 
And confidence. 

Stern mistress, we come to thee 
As children of darkness, stumbling 

In a world of unlighted ignorance, callous barbarity 
And disease. 



48 




Stern mistress, we come to thee 

As earnest, though unworthy scholars. 

A force beyond our understanding has brought us. 
Open your vast book to us so that we may learn. 

Sweet stern mistress, we come to thee 
To seek thy gift and do thy bidding. 
Equip our being with eyes for seeing. 

And hearts of feeling, and hands of healing. 



S. Siris 



49 




SEPTEMBER '66 

BRIGHT-EYED AND GREEN 
SO MUCH WAS UNKNOWN 



Our first building blocks were 
books, 




Those were days of personalities, of the "Eisenberg Uncertainty 
Principle"', the "Fenn Effect", and "Bailey's Law". 




On Halloween, the Krebs cycle ap- 
peared on the sidewalks of the medi- 
cal center, the presumed work of some 
friendly hobglobulin. 




Later our emotional releases matured. 



and somehow we survived. 



51 




rar wmIs destroying WBJSSL 

** " svi avenue Vietnam Peace Parade CQMmvtja 



» Out & ASIA/ 







*.*K 




THE 

ftBAMIATC 



AND THEN IT WAS THE SECOND YEAR 




Filled with germs 







0ft 



*£*.. "5 



is a 



L" 






and things 




and "pathobiology." 




and drugs 




In those days, the key words were "ultrastructure," 



54 



AND "THERE WILL BE 
ANOTHER QUIZ NEXT 

MONDA Y. " 




and grew, 



)F NAII0N5.S 



The Nuclear Arsenals: A Balance ol l e. 




% 



?M 




I# 



— i n ^ v Con*p overrun T 

yv A Dak iuc 

Dakfo * 

.■■ff' re f 




wnngWeek 



y*s Miami. 
«X 



% 



"of 



a mm a nrrc! m\T ~\Tf\rtmrT lrrrvriAT a n/r 




«fc 



V 



^ 



McCarthy 









^ 



This was Chicaga 



*% 



«?c e 



^STAND 

s*rp FOR 



r P© 




AVf 



%s 



©^ 



J* 



V 1 



^ Israel, Enypt 

Planes Trade i^f i 
Costly Raids 



COMMON MARKET -fc^ 






IN OUR THIRD YEAR WE MOVED INTO 

AN ENTIRELY NEW WORLD, 




The clinical world 




Early on we learned about the physical . . . 





and history. 




We worshipped the giants. 



We held the hooks. 



58 




We pursued the pearls . 



AS OUR 24 HOUR DAY 



. . . and were pursued by scut 



STRETCHED 




morning 



noon 



and night. 



59 



i 



" 



■ 

..-,.'.-■■ 



Unfulfilled 




■ra 



-ft*. 



"r^n 









IHish and Lou; in Americi 



V 



Man's Audacity Turns Drea m Into Keality 



Fa 



ear 



i 



<&$ 



M 



^ 



Transplant 



7 1 



"V v. 



ECAME 
IN PEACE 
FOR ALL 
MANKIND" 



Lv v V V 



?, 



July, 1969 A.D. 



L^ 



^^ 



uCi 



,•--, 



17: 



V 



V£ 



,ci 



o 



,tf5 



^S 



.^ 



*a 






k»i 



■*■.■ 



■-■ 



f£& 



>**^ 



?;• > 



& 






••*.:■•• 



-^ 



^ 



jr^*, 






i 

lets 



^ 



£ 



% 



^ 






•>"-*' 



i ,* 



•f . / 



, - • \ » . \ 



*& 



AND THE FOURTH YEAR BROUGHT 




It became our job 




to read charts, 



and X-rays 



and patient's 
minds. 




New worlds to conquer. 




We applied ourselves to night duty, 



62 



, 



(ij>Uf «r at Vbnuuna ami SmivoR* 



nf oiTtm ftorici 



HH T«-r Sc.l«r.n 



most uuo have wi in scbutud 
aimsiuf ajtucasicb . nus i 
00 SO ., Aj SOPH & wssiaii. 
00 WOT WAH WTU ALL *« C0HPLCT10. 



«. CEOtCE A. rttEIA. A SS0C.DEA5 
Ini floor- »«■ *31 



I 



APPROVED INTERNSHIPS 



, , . ■ 



l| Hr.,.klin ,ifiO <ju«rt» 






and dreams of internships. 




Then one magic moment 




and suddenly it mattered. 



someone said "What do you think. Doctor?" 



63 



THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS & 

SURGEONS 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT 




Vice President in Charge of Medical Affairs and Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 



He came up from North Carolina with a soft accent, keen mind, a sense of 
humor and in time made an indelible mark in his chosen field. The ill that have 
benefited from his efforts number in the millions, the reknown and respect he has 
won is international in scope. He is our Dean and this June is as significant to him 
as it is to us, for as we depart from the secure confines of P&S nervously clutch- 
ing our diplomas, Dr. Merritt will be retiring as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 
And rather than ask him to write a graduation note to us, we decided to print a 
few words about him. 



66 



The good dean came to Columbia near the end of World War II after spending 
several years setting things right in Cambridge. He was elevated to Chairman of 
the Neurology Department and Chief of the Neurological service in 1948 and ten 
years later assumed the honors and burdens of being Dean and Vice-President of 
the University. His record of achievements over the years is astounding in quality, 
quantity, and variety. He is a rare personification of the man of diverse abilities: 
teacher, clinician, scientist, author, administrator. 



Item: An animal model of epilepsy he developed led directly to his 
introduction of diphenylhydantoin 25 years ago, still the primary 
anti-convulsant in use today. But he is probably best known in neurol- 
ogy for his original work in elucidating the dynamics of the CSF and 
its diagnostic importance. Another area of major work has been in clar- 
ifying the effects of neurosyphilis, and he has received awards for his 
contributions to the efforts against multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy. 

Item: Since 1930 Dr. Merritt has published well over 200 scientific 
articles, edited six books in various fields of Neurologv and authored 
five texts of his own including his Textbook of Neurology. Now in its 
fourth edition, this latter work is considered by most as the best neurol- 
ogy text in the English language and is one of the few definitive sin- 
gle-authored works remaining in medicine. 

Item: Besides his duties at Columbia the Dean has served as presi- 
dent of numerous national neurological organizations, sat on various 
government committees, been an honorary member of medical and 
neurological societies in several foreign countries and other states, and 
has acted as President or Vice-President of several international con- 
gresses. 




The American Neurology Association summed up things well in the citation for 
presenting its JACOBY AWARD to "him in 1965: "As exemplary clinician, 
teacher, lucid writer and outstanding scholar, he has for many years presented 
Neurology in its best light and he remains an inspirational influence to a host of 
students and resident physicians. As administrator and counselor he has strongly 
influenced the development of the specialty at Harvard and Columbia Univer- 
sities, in America and the World." 

But we his students think of him in a somewhat different light, not so much the 
man called to a foreign dictator's sick-bed, but the slightly rotund elf that read 
"Twas the Night Before Christmas" (with his own slight modifications) at our 
annual Christmas Party. He was the Great Man lecturing to the lowly second year 
students who could "speak louder, but can't be any funnier." On his rounds we 
were impressed with the vast store of experience he could call upon and also by 
the Babinski he elicited when removing a slipper. 




He is a man with a funny story always ready, with a natural 
ability to put people at ease. He is a wise, justly world-famous 
man for his intellectual achievements, but he is also a warm 
person with an unassuming nature that makes us regret we did 
not have more contact with him during our years at P&S. For 
our class we thank him for what he taught us about disease 
and about people, for our school we thank him for his leader- 
ship and the personal prestige he added to the institution. To 
him, a great physician and a great man, we add our best 
wishes for a productive future in retirement. Ave atque Vale, 
Dr. Merritt. 

Richard M. Spiegel 

President, Class of 70 



67 




w h v 



EDWARD W. DEMPSEY 
"Sorry I missed you. " 



FREDERIC J. AGATE 

"Is it the cigar or 

the lab that slinks" 




A 

n 

A 

o 

CD 

V 



WILFRED M. COPENHAVER 

"/ suppose you folks have 
come to wake me up 
for another year. " 





CHARLES A. ELY 
The Gray Beret 



HERBERT O. ELFTMAN 

"I have here in my 

hands a device that 

will keep the students 

awake for my entire 

lecture. " 





MALCOLM B. CARPENTER 
"Don't worry; it all comes 
together in the end. " 



CHARLES R. NOBACH 
" Yeah, well, ya know ..." 





GEORGE D. PAPPAS 

"Hey, you know, these 

sagittal sections get 

better every year. " 



MELVIN L. MOSS 

The gospel according 

to St. Melvin. 





RICHARD P. BUNGE 

"How much do 

you remember?" 



69 



NANCY TROTTER 

"Once upon a time there 

was a little bile 

canaliculus. " 




Ki 




PARITHYCHERY SRINIVASAN 
s-RNA-vasan 




ALVIN I. KRASNA 
"If they are basic building blocks, why call them acids" 



'BIOCOTCDISS'R'if 




DAVID SHEMIN 

'You want my blood?" 



SEYMOUR LIEBERMAN 

"Lieberman 's the name, 
steroids the game. " 




DAVID NACHMANSOHN 

"A I Einstein? Of course, I knew him well. " 



70 



MAX A. EISENBERG 

"We'll take these pathways i 
three's; after all, tri- 
cycles are kid stuff, " 





WILLIAM L. NASTUK 

"No one will ever believe 

my action potential. " 



JOHN S. BRITTEN 

"I got lost 

somewhere in the 

ileum. " 




JOHN V. TAGGART 

"The kidney is really an artistic 

structure — look at these ionic columns. ' 




RAIMOND EMMERS 
"I thought I heard an afferent walley. " 



LOUIS T.CIZEK 

"May your canoe never 

leak on the river nephron. ' 




9%VSI0C06V 



SHU CHIEN 
"I 'm forming a 

new bus 

company serving 

New Jersey from 

upper Manhattan. " 





MERO NOCENTI 

"Is marrow responsive to 

endocrine feed back?" 



MARTIN BLANK 



71 





HARRY M. ROSE 
"I found a uniform virus at Ft. Dix. " 



CDIC<RO<BIO£ 06^ 



SAM M. BEISER 

"Poor boy; inhaled through the pipette 
and developed eso-phage-itis. " 



^ • 




BERNARD F. ERLANGER 

"Pen is mightier than the sore. " 




CALDERONHOWE 

"I go buggy over Bach. " 





HERBERT S. ROSENKRANZ 

"DNA analysis is scintillating. " 



PAULD. ELLNER 

"Getting G. C. from toilet seats 

is a privilege reserved for the 

clergy. " 



STUART TANNENBAUM 





COUNCILMAN MORGAN 

"Happiness is an EM view 
of conjugation. " 




ELVIN A. KABAT 

"Everything J know is on that 

board " 



GABRIEL C. GODMAN 



i&* 



i 




r 



& 









SHIN-CHUN WANG 
"Why you no womit?" 



BRIAN F. HOFFMAN 

"Foxglove is a lovely 

bush to give the 

heart such extra push. " 




HERBERT J. BARTELSTONE 
"I'll have to ask Mother. " 





NORMAN KAHN 

"Phase II block is 

not a football 

signal. " 




WILBUR H. SAWYER 

"I slipped pit ressin in 
Lou Cizek's urea bottle." 



HSUEH-HWAWANG 

Mother 




FREDERICK G. HOFMANN 
"Our hero in second year. " 







<P 
% 
A 
<R 
CD 
A 
C 


c 



6 

V 



LOWELL M. 
GREENBAUM 
The Histamine Kid 




■■■■^■■■■■i 



VhG'H0C06y 




DAVID SPIRO 

"1 don 'I care what you read in Robbins. " 




AUSTIN D. JOHNSTON 
"And the marrow holds WOcc of 80 proof.' 



JOSEPH WEINER 

"As second year medical students you have 

no right to take a position on anything. " 

1966, 1967 





DONALD WEST KING 

"Don 'I worry; you can sell them to 

next year's class. " 





HENRY A. AZAR 
"Just call me Kala. " 



BERNARD M. WAGNER 

"Next year we'll sell 

popcorn at the CPC's. " 



WILLIAM A. BLANC 

"Zees eez a floppy baby. " 



74 




k 






NATHAN LANE 
"Lane is synonymous with path. ' 



DAVID COWEN 

'You don't recognize me with the 

lights on." 





ANGELO 

''Lights, 
camera, 

act . . . 
Angelo. " 



RAFFAELE LATTES 
"So you want to Jo the autopsy together. ' 




PA<RASIG0£061J 



KATHLEEN L. HUSSEY 
'What's this crap on my microscope? 





HAROLD W. BROWN 

"I'm endowing the Brown Stool 

for Parasitology. " 



75 




ALBERT R. 

LAMB, Jr. 
"I put those I 
grippe tabs 

somewhere!'' 




STANLEY E. BRADLEY 

"What do you call it, dialysis?" 




ALBERT W. 
GROKOEST 

"Grow it 
where you 




GEORGE L. 
CURRAN 

"Let's run 

over the 

medications. " 





HARRY W. FRITTS 

"It's settled: I do believe in clear thought 
and slow talk. " 



GEORGE W. 
MELCHER 

"Welcome to 
group clinic. " 



\h 



' 






HAMILTON 
SOUTHWORTH 

"/ wish they made 
these tables higher. " 

DANAW.ATCHLEY 

"Perhaps we'd better begin anyway." 



ARTHUR R. 

WERTHEIM 
"VII give a nickel 
for any disease I 
haven't heard of." 




76 




JOHN H. LARAGH 

"This furosemide 

really works" 



> 





CHARLES A. RAGAN 

"/ heard the stretchers 

don't fit in the 

elevators" 



GERARD M. TURINO 

"Next year the clinics 

will be on Sunday 

afternoon. " 





ELIOT F. K. OSSERMAN 

"And then one of 

them said, If you've 

seen one you've 

seen them all. " 



DONALD A. HOLUB 

THE NOBLEMEN 
ANDRE F. COURNAND DICKINSON W. RICHARDS 



I I 



¥ 





HENRY ARANOW 

"Oh doctor, I've heard so 

much about your physical 

diagnosis" 



DEWITT S. GOODMAN 





SIDNEY C.WERNER 



JOHN N. LOEB 
"Don 7 let anyone 
know you caught 
me sitting down " 





DAVID J. GOCKE 

"That's a very aboriginal 
idea, Dn Gocke. " 




PAUL A. MARKS 

"It's my journal 

and I'll publish 

anything I 

damn well please." 



CHARLES L. CHRISTIAN 



4 




HYMIE L. NOSSEL 





"To clot . . . 
or not to clot. 



STUART W. 
COSGRIFF 



E. CARWILLE 
LEROY 



HAROLD C. NEU 

"Sure I'll do another 
CPC. " 




; '^ wm im.-- 



THOMAS Q. U 

MORRIS ' 

"Lets get the Res. " 



WILLIAM P. LOVEJOyI 

"Listen sonny, ifvou 

can 'l read that EKG 

111 knock the hell 

out of you. " 





REJANE HARVEY 

"If you think Harlem 

Hospital x-rays are 

bad, you should 

have been at Belleview" 




PAUL J. CANNON 



DANIEL V. KIMBERG 
". . . good looking, hard- 
working gastroenterologist 
will take cut in 
salary, seeks position 
in cooler climate. " 





FELIX E. DEMARTINI 

"Are you sure Arnold 
Palmer started like this. " 




JOHN E. ULTMAN 
"Good-bye Stanley, good-bye" 




LIONEL GROSSBARD 

M.IRENE FERRER 

". . . compatible with 

myocardial disease and/or 

drug effect. " 



» 





* -«^% 




CHARLES A. FLOOD 

"Gastroscopic study of 

the rectum revealed 

a very frightened patient. " 




JOHN BUCHANAN 

"Chug-a-lug" 



RICHARD J. STOCK 





GEORGE HUMPHREYS 
"Free at last. " 







w 



FREDERIC P. HERTER 

Inherit the wind. 




PHILIP D. WIEDEL 

Prince Philip 




Sk 




DAVID V. HABIF 

"Then, if all else 
fails ..." 



HAROLD G. BARKER 




"Ha, I knew it was a slider. ' 



FERDINAND F. McALLISTER 

"Always keep your feet 

above your head" 

MILTON R. PORTER 



ALFRED JARETZKI 

"I'd suggest 

mediastinoscopy. " 







3RR '' 




&/ 



CARL R FEIND EDWARD B. SELF 

Parathyroids 



JOHN M.KINNEY 
"Burns, baby, burns. " 




GEORGE F. CRIKELAIR 
"Just nosing around. " 

JOHN N. SCHULLINGER 
"Small bowel, small wonder. " 





GRANT SANGER 
Delicatessen? 



"It's only a few minutes by shuttle. " 
JOSE M. FERRER FREDERICK R. RANDALL 



i 



ROBERT H. WYLIE 
Breathtaking 





SHIVAJIB. BHONSLAY 
"A Lump; where?" 




ARTHUR B. VOORHEES 
Non-pulsed 

THOMAS V. SANTULLI 
"Here kiddies, kiddies. " 






JOHN A. BUDA 
"At long last, Stan." 




JOHN PRUDDEN 

"Hasn 't changed 

a bit. " 



FRANK GUMP 




JOHN B. PRICE. JR. 

"Oh no, my wife is having 
liver again tonight. " 





CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN 

"For of the most high 

Cometh healing. " 



SVEN KISTER 
"Take off ye r blouse! ' 



ROBERT B. HIATT 
"/ see no need to dilly-dally. ' 





EDMUND N. GOODMAN 



JAMES R. MALM 
" Wanna play hearts?" 






'-^£S 




ALFRED M. MARKOWITZ 
"That's Billroth 1; 
who's Billroth II?" 





RICHARD L. MASLAND 

"And how did vou like 

Neurology?" 



J. LAWRENCE POOL 

"I'm not going 
for honors." 






E 
U 
<R 



s 
u 

<R 
6 
E 
<R 
TIEU^ROEOG^ 






CARMINE VICALE 

"There are no 

hysterics; 

they're all 

malingerers. " 



LESTER A. MOUNT 

Hope on land and 

sea. 



H. HOUSTON MERRITT 

"I can't be any funnier, but I can 

talk louder. " 



DANIEL SCIARRA 



EDGAR M. HOUSEPIAN 



THE SQUASH TEAM 

SIDNEY CARTER 
ROGER C.DUVOISIN 




ARNOLD GOLD 





s* 



Vfg, 




CHARLES M. STEER 
"Thar story's in 
the traveling 
salesman file. " 




VINCENT FREDA 
K.ARLIS ADAMSONS 
"Heme-men" 



EDWARD T. BOWE 
"Oh, Bowel" 



DEPT. OF LABOR RELATIONS 



RAYMOND M. 

McCAFFERY 

"Bored member" 



ORLAND J. MILLER 

"Expert on internal 

affairs" 



OK-oyn 



RAYMOND L. 
VANDE WIELE 

STANLEY M. BYSSHE 

"Then the fourth 
year student delivered 
the third year 
student. " 





SOLAN CHAO 

"Ciao" (so-long in Italian) 





GILBERT J. VOSBURGH 
"/ think it's my fundus" 



W. DUANE TODD 

"Let's see, is it 
today or yesterday?" 



ROBERT E. HALL 

"Legal Counsel" 



HAROLD SPEERT 
"Hystorian" 









^ 





* 



JERRY C. JACOBS 

"A/v, what a lovely group!" 



GILBERT W. MELON 

"I wonder if J can use magnetic 
tape to wrap Christmas presents" 




JOHN F. NICHOLSON 
"I wish his name 
were John 
Lennon or Ringo 
Starr. " 



DEAN N. MARTIN 
"Everybody 
loves somebody 
sometime ..." 



<PE<DIAS<RICS 



EDWARD C. CURNEN 
"How do vou think the clinic 
can be improved?" 






SIDENY BLUMENTHAL 



KATHERINE SPRUNT 
"/ understand that 
H. Flu grow well on 
celluloid. " 




JAMES A. WOLFF 
"What big eyes you have, my dear!" 




SYLVIA R GRIFFITHS 



"It's all a mailer of heart 
"and a little pll as well. " 



L. STANLEY JAMES 



ROBERT W. WINTERS 






V 



DAVID H. BAKER 
"Shucks, it's 
kids' stuff." 




WILLIAM B. SEAMAN 

"Welcome to radiology. 

Zap, you're sterile" 




WALTER E. BERDON 

"There's an essential 

difference between pediatric 

and adult radiology" 



MIECZYSLAW FINSTER 

"Passing gas can be 

exhausting" 



KENT ELLIS 

"Well yes, I agree 

it's a chest x-ray; 

but can you be 

more specific" 



m 



KALfri G. av-iiLAJSGES 

"Bard Hall rents are 

going up and the 

elevators still don 't work. " 




,-.._.. „ „._.. , ..... 



ATL'ES'G'H'ESIOCOGy 






RONALD L. KATZ 
My thumb keeps twitching. ' 



86 



EMANUEL M. PAPPER 

"Southern Comfort" 



CHARLES E. WOLF 
"Two minutes and forty 

five seconds have 

passed. What are you 

going to do?" 




1 



•PS'UC'XIAC^I) 



w LAWRENCE C.KOLB 

"Maybe I'll rewrite 
a book. " 



ROBERT MICHELS 

"// beats using 
(he microphone" 



r 





< 



RICHARD DRUSS 

"Why are you 

compelled to say 

that, Bob?" 



ALVIN M. MESNIKOFF 
"This is my turf and 
don 't you forget it. " 



DONALDKORNFELD 
"Whaddaya mean 
yer sick? You just 

think yer sick. Yer nuts. " 



ISRAEL KESSELBRENNER 

"Maybe we should wait 

for the second bus. " 




<DE<RCDAG 0£ 0611 'REftA'B CDE'DICMIE 



CARL T.NELSON 
"Only my hairdresser knows for sure. " 





ROBERT C. DARLING 
"Igor! Igor! " 



ALBERT 

"Yeah, boss" 







JOHN K. LATTIMER 
"I hope you pass your boards 
just as well. " 



HANS H. ZINSSER 
"After dribbling, you passed 
a basketball?" 



MEYER M. MELICOW 
"Cysts and stones 
may break my bones. " 



CPflGtHAODOCOG'Sf 



c 

A 
V 

6 


c 



CHARLES A. PERERA 

"There have been 

a few constricted 

pupils in this 

class. " 





OLAF 
HAROLDSON, JR. 



5 

LITTLE 
INDIANS 



A. GERARD DeVOE 

"Have you had your 

eyes checked?" 



GEORGE K. SMELSER 

'Wo, they've always 

been plain blue. " 



V 



DANIEL C. BAKER, JR. 






■I' 



3h< 



LAWRENCE SAVETSKY ROBERT M. HUI 

MILOS BASEK WILMORE NEIDITCH 





JUERGEN 

TONNDORF 

"Down 

Scope" 




FRANK E. STINCHFIELD 
"It's done with a cast 
of thousands. " 



MARVIN L. SHELTON 

"And watch how 

she moves it. " 



S.ASHBY GRANTHAM 
"Ha, fooled you: it's a 
flabella. " 





CHARLES T. RYDER 
"I think it's afoot." 





CHARLES S. NEER. II 

"Fine job, but wrong 

shoulder, " 



DAVID L. ANDREWS 
" What s a bad joint like 
this doing in a nice 
girl like you?" 




HAROLD M.DICK 
Hi, sport. 




SAWNIE R.GASTON 

"Gaposis in the plefond 

du tibial. " 



ANDREW L. 
BASSETT 

A stretch of 
the imagination 




ROBERT E. CARROLL 

"Well, it's not actually 
manual labor. " 




#» <^ *'!, 



» 






jm 




GEORGE I. LYTHCOTT 

Associate Dean 

Associate Professor of Administrative Medicine 





ROBERT H. E. ELLIOTT, JR. 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Clinical Surgery 



SHIRLEY C. FISK 

Associate Dean 

Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 



MELVIND.YAHR 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Neurology 





Early in January of this year it was announced that Dr. 
Douglas S. Damrosch had been selected to be the first 
Director of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. 
The position he will hold as Director is intended to lead 
the way into the period when "CPMC" will become more 
than a hyphenated phrase. 

Dr. Damrosch, a very able pediatrician before his ten- 
ure as Associate Dean under Dr. Merritt, is the first per- 
son to be jointly appointed to a job by the trustees of 
both the Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University. 
The nature of the position will make him responsible for 
all areas of the medical center in which interest is taken 
by both the school and the hospital. With the increasing 
complexity of this and other institutions, the breadth of 
the job will be enormous. Dr. Damrosch's leadership in 
this vital new role will be a key factor in the evolution of 
the Medical Center in the coming years. 



DOUGLAS S. DAMROSCH 



90 



C 

STUDENT 

L 

T 

Y 




A 




d 



/ 
/ 




P 



^G 



1 



/ 



/ 



REFLECTIONS ON A 



YEAR OF CHANGE 

It is difficult to conceive of a more fateful year than the last one in the history 
of P&S, and the graduating class of 1970 will undoubtedly be long remembered 
for its major involvement in the tumultuous events of this period. Troubles have 
run deep, not only in the Student Body but in the Faculty as well. No aspect of 
life jn our hitherto secure and relatively insulated community has escaped a dis- 
comforting reexamination; long-revered idols have been threatened, and traditional 
precepts related to education, authority and social responsibility have undergone 
challenge. It has been a time of questioning and change, and an exciting one. 

To say that the troubles besetting the Medical Cen- 
ter are purely indigenous is no more valid than to as- 
sert that the changes effected are all the consequence 
of student activism. Every educational institution has 
been subject to the same unrest, and ferment has oc- 
curred at both faculty and student levels elsewhere, as 
in our own institution. Yet it cannot be denied that 
certain local factors illuminated the need for change at 
P&S, and that the students greatly accelerated the time 
schedule of reform. 

It is not necessary to dilate on the universal causes 
for protest among the young — they are many and 
complex. Suffice it to say that the general dissatisfac- 
tions with the "establishment" have found expression 
locally and that the traditionalistic concepts of univer- 
sity function have come under heaviest attack. 
Infinitely the most important question posed by the 
students, in this year of" many questions, relates to the 
social responsibility of a university institution. In 
specific terms, should the Columbia-Presbyterian Med- 
ical Center, which until this time has distinguished it- 
self as an entity devoted to selective medical care, 
teaching and scholarly pursuit, alter the direction of its 
attentions towards the rapidly expanding medical and 
sociological problems of the community? Should not 
the intellectual resources and energies of our institu- 
tion be probing methods of health care delivery with 
an intensity equal to that spent on the study of disease 
or the education of a doctor? Should we not recognize 
the incongruity of a medical center existing in the midst of a deprived and medi- 
cally underserviced population without one relating in a meaningful way to the 
other? Should not good medical care be a right rather than an economic privilege? 
These related questions are valid, and they must be answered now — or cer- 
tainly before they are answered by government or the community itself. Regard- 
less of how strong the arguments may be against such a commitment — and there 
are many in the institution who feel that any deviation from the traditional role of 
the Medical Center in education and scholarship would dilute effort and lessen 
excellence — the pressures from without are such that some form of commitment 
to active community service will be mandatory 




92 



The University has already moved in this direction to a 
degree. The responsibility for Harlem Hospital has been 
accepted, albeit reluctantly; an Associate Dean for 
Community Affairs has been appointed, and in the 
Washington Heights area, the recently appointed Com- 
munity Affairs Committee, largely student-directed, has 
been extremely active. To an innovative University ad- 
ministration, the challenges in this emerging area of 
health care delivery are unlimited, and perhaps nowhere 
in the world does the opportunity for implementing such 
programs exist to the degree that it does in the vast Co- 
lumbia medical complex, situated as its components are 
in economically and socially deprived regions of New 
York. The thrust of the next decade will provide the ima- 
ginative leadership so sadly lacking at the present time. 

While the conscience of the Medical Center has been 
awakened in this field, in substantial part through the in- 
sistent activities of the students, many of the internal 
workings of our institution have simultaneously under- 
gone scrutiny and change, again in large part through 
student participation. Shortly after the Columbia campus 
confrontations of the spring of 1968, a Student-Faculty 
Affairs Committee was formed at P&S; through this 
group, student representation in some of the key College 
committees was effected. The important Curriculum Committee, which has forged 
new departures in curricular content at P&S. has been ably assisted in its workings 
by students. The Presidential Advisory Committee to seek a new Dean has had 
four representatives from the student body, and I can say from personal experi- 
ence that they have served responsibly and effectively in this capacity. Moves are 
now afoot to gain student representation on the Executive Faculty, the Admissions 
Committee and the Library Committee. No matter what projections can be made 
for the future of P&S, there is little question but that henceforth there will be ac- 
tive student participation in virtually all the policy bodies. 

This move has been greeted with mixed emotions by the Faculty and Hospital 
administration. Those who have witnessed the students functioning in responsible 
positions have become convinced that their participation is of real value. A larger 
number, however, have seen only the "activist" fringe at work, and have experi- 
enced only the defiance, the disrespect and the arbitrary nature of confrontation. 
To this segment of the "establishment", student activities have assumed a destruc- 
tive and threatening quality which has effectively disguised the more constructive 
and reasoned liberalism of the student majority. The uneasy lesson learned from 
other campuses is that confrontation is an effective tactic; its immediate gains, 
however, are counterbalanced by the fears and hostilities it engenders. I trust that 
this lesson has been learned also, and that in the future forceful and uninformed 
protest will not prevail as a substitute for responsible involvement. Perhaps there 
is too little awareness on the part of the student body that a vast reservoir of re- 
sponsiveness exists among their peers, ready to be tapped if the approach is an in- 
telligent one. 

In balance, I feel that the questions asked and the changes effected during the 
past year have been good ones. A new spirit of optimism is emerging at all levels 
in the College and Hospital as a consequence, and I think it more than likely that 
the next ten years will see our school not only regain its former privileged position 
among educational institutions, but surpass it. We thank this graduating class for 
the stimulus it has provided, and we trust that in future years it will see its efforts 
well rewarded. 

Frederic P. Herter, M.D. 




The editors wish to thank Dr. Herter for accepting the invitation to reflect on recent events and future 
promise at P&S. 



93 



REFLECTIONS ON CURRICULAR CHANGE 

Last summer the course directors of all of the "pre-clinical" courses met to discuss the new curricu- 
lum. Halfway through the meeting, one of the more candid faculty members asked to be introduced to 
the others. Each teacher then in turn announced his name and department as if he were attending the 
first meeting of foreign diplomats. The analogy is appropriate because this was the first time that the 
course directors ever had all gotten together to discuss the curriculum! This striking fact emphasizes 
both the difficulty and significance of curricular change at Columbia. 

For the most part the new curriculum is similar to the curricula that most of the country's medical 
schools are adopting. The emphasis is on flexibility and earlier introduction of clinical instruction. The 
most dramatic changes affect the "pre-clinical" years. Basic science courses are shortened and clinicians 
are given a major role in teaching. Thus the largest block of time in the third semester is given to a 
course on history taking and the physical examination and to another course called "Abnormal Human 
Biology," in which clinicians will demonstrate how basic principles can be applied to clinical problems. 
The major clinical year is largely unchanged. Noon lectures have been abolished, the specialties quarter 
has been dismembered, and Urology and fourth-year Ob-Gyn have been modified and put into the 
major clinical year. These maneuvers leave eighteen months for elective time. Hopefully the basic sci- 
ence departments will actively participate in these electives both with their own courses and in courses 
given conjointly with clinical departments. Further, all of the Columbia affiliate hospitals have estab- 
lished curriculum committees and are offering elective programs. An extensive advisory system will in- 
crease student-faculty contact and help students plan the use of their extensive elective time. 

Like lots of good ideas, these changes sound great — but will they work? In one sense, we will never 
know, because formal evaluation of the curriculum is impossible. First of all, the old curriculum was 
never objectively evaluated, so we have no control data. National Board scores are a superficial way to 
judge any course — and the board exams are changing anyway, so their usefulness for evaluating curri- 
cular change is limited. Too many variables — the preparation of students, for instance — are changing 
along with the curriculum to ascribe effects to one or another cause. Finally, what criteria can we use to 
judge the finished product — the doctor? Should we look at performance on examinations, performance 
during internship, or the dedication and knowledge of the physician twenty years from now? We are 
thus forced to rely on the impressions of students and faculty alone in evaluating the curriculum. Trial 
and error will surely be the rule, so it is crucial that mistakes be acknowledged and rectified. 

If we could evaluate curriculum, we might find that curriculum means not very much compared to 
the quality and quantity of faculty. Surely a curriculum is only the barest guide to the teaching that 
goes on at a school. In this context we are faced with serious problems that curricular change cannot 
solve. Basic science departments are financed largely by research grants. Large portions of clinical 
teaching are done by doctors who are not paid for their efforts. Promotions in any department are sel- 
dom based on teaching prowess. It doesn't take a systems analyst to figure out that medical schools are 
not designed to maximize the quality or quantity of instruction. A cynic could easily make a case for 
the converse proposition! 

These limitations on teaching manpower are not vague abstractions, but have concrete consequences. 
Anyone who spends time designing an imaginative course receives virtually no reward. The consequence 
is courses whose format has been unchanged in a generation. Basic scientists are busy in their labs in 
departments much too small to cope with their teaching load, and the consequence is large lecture 
courses taught by a distant, often uninterested faculty. 

Finally, a new curriculum is taught by the same old people. Some of the faculty, fortunately a small 
minority, actively opposed the new curriculum at its onset and may not try as hard as they might to see 
it succeed. People are slow to change, and feelings are easily hurt. A prerequisite for an effective core 
curriculum and interdisciplinary electives is interdepartmental cooperation. This cooperation is still 
almost nonexistent. 

This article sounds pessimistic because it emphasizes the difficulty of accomplishing change. Yet even 
our class has already seen what will perhaps be the new curriculum's greatest achievement. For the first 
time in years teachers are actively examining their courses — and the courses of others. Formally and 
informally faculty have increasingly asked students how well their courses have succeeded. Further, one 
of the unexpected consequences of the new advisory system is that members of every department are 
becoming aware for the first time of the problems of first-year medical students. This atmosphere of 
self-evaluation, if it continues, may have consequences far more significant than any specific course 
plan in the new curriculum. 

Henry M. Kronenberg 



94 



fourth year 

Richard M. Spiegel 
Edward C. Jones 
Linda F. Pessar 
William A. Tansey 
Danne Lorieo 



CLASS OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

P&S Club Representative 



third year 

Peter H. Moyer 
Richard M. Spiegel 
Linda F. Pessar 
William A. Tansey 
Danne Lorieo 



second year 

Peter H. Moyer 
Richard M. Spiegel 
Linda F. Pessar 
William A. Tansey 
Danne Lorieo 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

P&S Club Representative 



first year 

Peter H. Moyer 
Richard M. Spiegel 
Caroline A. Riely 
Gretchen Kronenberg 
Danne Lorieo 



Search-for-a-Dean Committee Representative: Henry M. Sondheimer 
Curriculum Committee Representative: Henry M. Kronenberg 



ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA 




Alpha Omega Alpha is a national medical honor society whose members are 
elected on the basis of scholarship and character. The society's motto, "To be 
worthy to serve the suffering," embodies the spirit of the organization. 



elected members 



May 1969 

Philemon Dickinson 
Paul Robert Hickey 
Steve Kohl 

Henry Morris Kronenberg 
John C. Madigan 
Phillip Keith Peterson 
Carol Ann Raviola 



95 



November 1969 

Richard Charles Boucher 
John Mallory Burks 
David A. Burton 
Dennis Anthony Carson 
Gary Neal Foulks 
Richard Joel Kates 
Walter B. Lundberg 
Barry Michael Massie 
Michael Frank Parry 
Donald Oliver Quest 
Candace Cooper Walworth 
Alan Elliot Zuckerman 




EXPLORING 

NEW 

HORIZONS 



MEDICINE IN THE TROPICS 



The Medicine in the Tropics Program began in 1951 and 
under its auspices about 300 students and 60 wives have served 
in hospitals from Guatemala to Taiwan. The popularity of the 
program is indicated by the growth from 14 students (4 wives) 
in 1967 to 32 students (11 wives) in 1970 with a proposed 37 
students (16 wives) in 1971. 

The purpose of the program is not to train students to spe- 



cialize in tropical medicine but to permit participation in re- 
sponsible medical care of the usual cosmopolitan diseases and 
specific tropical or parasitic diseases of the area served. Partici- 
pants become acquainted with the public health efforts of the 
country they choose, learn first hand how other parts of the 
world live, and enjoy rather wide travels to and from the cho- 
sen hospital. 



LIBERIA 



"This may explain the deep appeal of the seedy. It is nearer the 
beginning; Monrovia has begun to build wrong, but at least it has 
only begun; it hasn't gone so far away as the smart, the new, the 
chic, the cerebral." 

Graham Greene, 1936, Journey Without Maps 




There are very few places in Africa 
that look like Walt Disney would 
have you believe. Liberia is one. It is 
solid jungle complete with palm trees, 
butterflies, humidity, screeching crea- 
tures and creepy crawlers. Upcountry 
one sees very occasional clearings in 
the forest crammed with tin roofs if 
the road goes there, or grass roofs if it 
doesn't. One of the larger aggrega- 
tions of tin roofs on "The Zin Zin 
Road," almost up to Guinea is 
ZorZor. Its Lutheran Mission Hospital 
and one doctor constitute the main 
health care for over 60,000 upcountry 
Liberians. 



Scores of patients are dimly visible inside the 
fieldstone and plaster structure. Some lie on beds, 
some on the floor, in the aisles, even under the 
beds. Here the patients bring family or friends to 
cook for them. The air is thick with the pungent 
mixture of palm oil, damp earth, people, kola nuts 
and urine. Out back is a cluster of mud and thatch 
huts composing the T.B. compound, and down a 
path in back is a Leper Colony. 

The hospital surgeon, pediatrician, administra- 
tor, pharmacist, county health organizer and chief 
of medicine are all Paul Mertens, M.D., 35 year 
old Minnesota born and bred Lutheran Mission- 
ary who holds the keys to every closet in the hos- 
pital (rumor has it that he let a poisonous snake 
go in the drug stock room to scare off would-be 
medicine thieves). Second in command - or per- 



haps first at times — is a living legend: Esther 
Bacon, the missionary nurse who landed in a long- 
boat 28 years ago, marched upcountry on foot (no 
roads yet), and became nurse, mother, obstetri- 
cian, champion of the vacuum extractor, midwi- 
fery teacher and human whirlwind. 

What can a fourth year medical student do up 
there? Anthing one has confidence enough to try. 
Like dentistry — that's where I started. With the 
aid of the Manual of Dental Anesthesia opened to 
the appropriate page, I tugged and yanked out 
rotten shells of former teeth (even tricky wisdom 
teeth). Then there were the days I played junior 
surgeon — suturing lacerations for warmup, then 
first-assisting C-sections, hernia repairs, laparoto- 
mies, appendectomies, etc. In my spare time I 
learned to catch babies. Of course, this was in ad- 



98 



dition to the basic doctoring on the wards. The 
first month I took the adults and the second 
month I became Pediatrician-in-residence. Dr. 



Martens and Esther Bacon were there at al 
of day or night to advise and encourage. 



hours 



The first Saturday after the full moon each month is 
well-baby clinic. Streams of mothers lined up with their little 
bobblv-headed kids strapped on their backs with strips of 
bright cloth. I headed four miles down the road to Fissebu 
town where, with the help of a male Liberian nurse, I held 
open air clinic. No intern, no resident, no senior resident, no 
attending, no consultant. Just a 3 x 5 card of antiparasitic dos- 
ages. People filed by with their complaints of "fresh cold" or 
"tever at night" (automatic response is, "Take two chloroquin 
for four days,") or "craw-craw" (any sore from impetigo to 
moluscum contagiosum). Once I traded a tube of AVC cream 
for a necklace of "country medicine" (little mummies of bee's 
wax and black cloth encasing a bit o'f paper with holy writing 
in Arabic). The woman undoubtedly thought I had some secret 
use in mind for her medicine. 




Memorabilia: 

— The driver ants move in unbreakable columns anywhere 
they choose. Their jaws are so strong that they were once used 
for suturing by allowing them to bite the wound then breaking 
off their bodies leaving the head. 

— The women scarify their abdomen or back with elaborate 
geometric designs. 

— In the corner of the tax collector's office is a stack of huge 
coils — old stills for production of "cane juice" seized when the 
men missed their tax deadlines. 

— As a remembrance of my trip I brought home a 5r"=>ll 
souvenir — a fifteen foot python skin. 

— There's mold so potent that it ruins X-rays and etches 
glass lenses in the microscopes within months. 

— 2:00 a.m.: Somebody shaking my foot? Probably just 
Esther wanting me to come help with a delivery. No, a big 
black rat sitting on my bed gnawing through the blanket and 
sheet on my heel! 

— In the midst of an operation some flying ants squeezed 
through the screens on the windows and headed straight for 
the only light, which was illuminating our operating site. They 
landed. What to do? Squish and flick (and put the patient on 
post-op antibiotics). 




The high point of the two months was a bush trip I made with three 
Liberians deep into the interior to vaccinate against smallpox and hand 
out some basic medicines (chloroquin, antibiotics) to the forest folk 
that rarely make it out to the main (dirt) road. We walked single file 
down rutted, muddy paths hopping over driver ants and swishing 
across streams. At each village we were greeted by the chief who wel- 
comed us into his mud hut and served us rice and "soup" (a murky 
mixture of peppers and chunks of meat ranging from wild bush hog to 
monkey meat). After some palm wine refreshment we tried to round 
up some willing victims for our needles. One night I slept in the room 
of an 18 year old girl who had just died from the bite of a poisonous 
snake. Everywhere we went there was one thing we could count on 
and that was a crowd following me staring at my pale face. Some peo- 
ple laughed but others were openly afraid. I was the first doctor ever to 
have visited those particular villages. 

You can bring to Africa your medical or technical knowledge but 
you will carry away with you much more than what you have left be- 
hind. 

Karen Kramer Hein 



99 



ST. LUKE'S 

St'. Luke's Hospital has long been a popular outpost for 
tenderfoot seniors longing to test their clinical skills. Twenty 
minutes on' IRT #1, an anxious jog through Columbia's 
Morningside Campus, and a not so certain elevator ride to 
Clark 5 (or was it 6?), or Scrymser 4 (or was it 3'/2?), or 
maybe Plant 8 was the familiar trail for the enthusiastic 
sub-intern aiming for 8:30 A.M. Styvesant rounds. 

Dr. Van Itallie's medical staff impressed us with their ac- 
cessibility and their learning. Chief Resident Al Muller 
looked after us with watchful eye to be sure all was well on 
our floors, to be sure our stay at St. Luke's was instructive, 
and, yes, to be sure we wouldn't run away with the ECG 
machine so well secured with tangled links to the closet 
wall. Times of crisis drew us to the ICU where Betsy Loeb's 
eager crew so competently protected our charges. Nor could 
we forget the cafeteria — a cornucopia of culinary delights 
— where we dined with our mentors and where expense was 
. absorbed around the clock by those little white cards. 

We also went to Luke's as surgeons, and as pediatricians, 
and to enjoy the international flavor of forceps handling at 
the oldest of New York City's women's hospitals. In all 
departments we experienced responsibility and careful guid- 
ance. The rotations away from the home ground were re- 
freshing chances to work hard, to learn, and to reflect upon 
yet another style of medical practice. 

William A. Tansey 



H 



5 ■*- 



) 



w: 




Dr. A. Roufa 





BASSETT 



Those of us who spent some time at the Bassett Hospital found the climate 
cooler, but the hospital atmosphere considerably warmer. The latter was an espe- 
cially welcome change. The attending staff (all full-time) and the house staff were 
for the most part willing and anxious to teach. The sub-internship programs in 
both medicine and surgery were set up in such a way that students generally felt 
that they were useful and functional members of a "team" and were no longer 
merely playing doctor. On both services the student was primary physician for all 
his patients and did not share responsibility with an intern. 

Although we worked fairly hard, everyone found time to take advantage of the 
fringe benefits of being out in the sticks. Several memorable golf games took place 
during the summer between students and house staff, and the studs seemed to 
have more trouble with the back nine than they did with the first two years of P& 
S. Many golf balls (the local medium of exchange) changed hands. Those of us 
with no golf balls passed our free time under less pressure sailing and playing 
tennis. 

In the hospital the atmosphere was fairly light-hearted. We did not feel that this 
detracted from good patient care at all. and it made work considerably more en- 
joyable. There was a great deal of serious teaching, but interspersed among the 
more serious bits of knowledge were some gems of surgical principle which should 
not go unrecorded. One can never forget Carey's First Law: Nothing bleeds like 
the aorta. Nor can one ignore the time tested maxim: The temperature in the op- 
erating room is indirectly proportional to the skill of the surgeon. The most astute 
contribution to medical knowledge, however, was made by Rick Spiegel. He won 
the coveted Student of the Year Award for pointing out (under great pressure) 
that the blood supply to the proximal navicular came from the heart. 

Generally, we felt that we learned a good deal and enjoyed ourselves doing it. 
Some of us were not anxious to return to Fun City. 

James Bordley 

101 



ROOSEVELT 



"All the opportunities for you to learn are here. Use them as you wish. If you 
don't have a good time, it's no one's fault but your own." With this startling in- 
troductory greeting the first group of students began their surgical sub-internships 
in June of their fourth year. In medicine, surgery, obstetrics, and cardiology, the 
message was the same: good medicine can be fun. We had already learned that 
good medical practice demands hard work. At Roosevelt we found that a gener r 
ous measure of humor and high house staff morale do not lessen the quality oif 
care. This attitude had not gone unnoticed by previous P&S students, and we saw 
many familiar faces on the house staff. 

Recollections: . . . Racing to keep up with Roosevelt's perpetual motion ma- 
chine, Dick Edie . . . EKG conference with Dr. Legato: "Obviously it's an ecto- 
pic, re-entrant, aberrantly conducted, parasystolic Kent system rhythm with mus- 
cle twitch interference." . . . Russell 2 to Evans 4 to C-7 to G-8 to Ward 3 — 
where's the Penthouse, anyway? . . . Liver rounds on Friday, invariably followed 
by a productive meeting of the West Side Knife-and-Gun Club . . . "Yes, Dr. 
Spiegel, your wife may visit you, but your on-call room is located in the obstetrics 
ward" . . . There really were no women on the house staff until Dr. Christy 
arrived? . . . Scrubbed with Dr. Wichern: "Can you tell me the eighteen common 
types of hernias?" . . . Duck when you enter the recovery room: "You're so bad!" 

The experience at Roosevelt was enjoyable and instructive. Many of our class 
will return for more. 

John M. Burks 





NICHOLAS P. CHRISTY 



WALTER WICHERN 






7 7 h r 



CHARLES A. RAGAN 





J 


1 

1 


\ 









REJANE M. HARVEY 



HARLEM 



This year the fourth-year students did clinical clerkships in four Harlem Hospi- 
tal services: Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, and Cardiology. The clerkships were 
marked by their flexibility. Student activities ranged from admitting and following 
patients, working in the Emergency Room, meeting with preceptors, riding ambu- 
lances, touring Harlem and its various health facilities (or lack thereof), attending 
conferences (including Chest: Drs. Harvey and Jones, EKG: Dr. Schmidt, Hema- 
tology: Dr. Lindenbaum, Neurology: Drs. Breust and Richter, Endocrinology: Dr. 
Sterling, and "Dr. Ragan's rounds") and discussing Harlem, Harlem Hospital, and 
their problems. 

Those students in the early part of the year saw the old hospital with its roaches 
and falling plaster; with its problems of too few nurses. X-ray and lab technicians, 
inadequate equipment and insufficient space (beds overflowed into the halls). 
Those who went after October saw the new hospital with its resultant improved 
patient morale and loyalty and improved staff morale and performance. 

However, the main problem which faced the old hospital still exists: how to de- 
liver adequate health care to the vast majority of Harlem's citizens. This problem 
demands innovative and courageous effort on the part of Columbia, the Harlem 
Community, and city, state and federal governments. Whether the answer is satel- 
lite clinics and/or more community control, etc., is uncertain, but experimental 
attempts at improvement must be one of Columbia's foremost concerns. 

Peter H. Moyer 



103 



DELAFIELD 



In the past four years at Columbia P&S, the medical curriculum has been bat- 
ted around. Four seems to equal one; one, to be sure, is still one, but also involves 
most of two; two has experienced inflation and is now three, and poor three, 
seeing its two confused neighbors, has given up and is waiting for next year. To be 
sure, in spite of this grand right and left, Columbia P&S will still educate good 
doctors. And with all respect to the Curriculum Committee, this result is due to 
the simple fact that P&S can offer unique clinical experience combined with excel- 
lent teaching. 

The Medicine rotation at Delafield Hospital is such an experience. The superb 
teaching of its medical staff permeates the entire medical center, but only a por- 
tion of each class are afforded the clinical encounter. With no interns at Delafield. 
the senior students are solely responsible for the day to day management of the 
patients. And being central figures, their education is no longer tangential to the 
actual clinical setting. 

The patients at Delafield cover the full range of the spectrum. If indeed their 
disease is chronic with a seemingly straightforward management, then the proper 
questions are surely not asked. And if their problems are more acute, then it is 
difficult to know which questions to answer first. Competence is rarely achieved, 
but confidence in one's potential is invariably developed. 

The tribulations are numerous and inescapable. But that is not important now, 
for they will only blur with the trials of years to come. 

Delafield breeds responsibility. Responsibility begets reason, and reason fosters 
respect for disease and people. 

G. H. Mudse 




Moments 




to be 



Remember: 



Remembered 




and 



Endured 



Remember: 

Changing bulbs during the Biochemistry exam 




The Governor 
&S&$Vi • issued a 

iSw' Si re P rieve! 

«iS&& to 



!% '-"^ 




Jaretzki explains, Madigan reacts, McMath in shock. 



Prophecy: 

PETER DINGELDEIN - will change his name 
... to John Dingeldein 





Say Ah 



Anybody ever tell you how beautiful your eves are. 



H||H|HHnnnn 


Quote: 


DR. JOHNSTON - "I had the great privilege of 


dismembering my secretary's body" 



Case of the page # I 

Is this an expanding coin lesion or merely a token 
lesion? (see pg. 125) 



This is the first Black building admission of . 





Quote: 
JOHN HOCHE - "Can an oyster be decorticate?" 




Anv dav, doctor. 





Hey, That's a gas! 
How do you get it across the border? 




••Ouch!" 



Remember: 

Dr. Ely rotating the gut 



Oh. doctor, 

you've done 

it! 



John, do vou know a prayer? 



Prophecy: 

BRUCE CASSIDY - will be fired as Ranger's team 
physician after he leaps onto the ice and scores against an 
open Montreal net. 






I 









,±~«« 


M^^t 4> 








' 'M 


Remember: 

The alarm clock awakening Dilley during 
resulting in a reading of 6 on the Richter 


; lecture 
scale 



THIS IS THE 21st 

CPMC ADMISSION . . 



* 



A 




¥ 



J± 



/_ 





Quote: 

DR. TAPLEY — "If you're not having fun on 

medicine, let me know. Something's wrong" 




Mast we discuss this right after dinner? 




Cuantos dias . 




_ J 


A « ~ £l 


H 


3L_ - r% 


\ ' 


&^i 




9 ' ^ 




W^jpA 




x^/jL 




I'm not sure but I think he's getting 
fresh 



If they're so smart how come they 
all speak broken Spanish? 



Prophecy: 

MIKE BERGER and RON ROTHENBERG - will 

develop a new wonder!!! drug. 



Take a deep 
breath and say 
cheese. 



/*fw~* 



Remember: 

The first I.V. you had to start. 



I was 
right; he 



amputee! 



109 



i 



/ 





"The pigs take security, the dogs guard the stairs, the 
monkeys occupy administration . . ." 



Quote: 

DR. MOORE - "I deal with the female body as 
a (w)hole" 





Prophecy: 

STEVE COLE — will be chief guru in residence 
for KTiatmandu 



"As I came in for mv second run with the bombs bursting 
about me . . ." 





But Candy, it's the real you. 



It's all rieht officer, he's with us. 




Remember: 

Trips to Manhattan State 




Dick! 




Quote: 

ASSORTED RUFFIANS - "Hey Bouche! How 
about a little one on one?" 



Ill 






Begin, Dick 



but it's not us 



Well it's Hip and, a, camp . 







Re 

Di 


member: 

. Gerst's s 


mile 









It's a nucleus 
and it sure is 
ambiguous 





I'm not moving 'til they rum that light on again 





If George knew there was a Red 
nucleus here . . . 



Looks like guppies. 



Quote: 

MARTY PROVINE in V.D. clinic 
"Smile, you're on Candid Camera" 



112 



It's a spirochete, pass it on 



Remember: 

Dr. Root spinning in his chair 




See, it's 

right up there. 



Prophesy: 

DAVE BURTON will publish his "Underlin- 
ings from the Encyclopedia Britannica" 




Gee, this is fun 
Rick, but you're 
fogging my glasses 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

Before metaphysicians (A) become orthodocs 
(C) the MD may pass through a free radical 
stage (B). Much heat is generally given off in 
this reaction and the stability of the inter- 
mediate product is often not great. The most 
extreme form of competitive reaction is the 
paradocsical shift (D) in which the MD becomes 
diametrically opposed to his collegues. 



(SO 



ifrs 



Pis 



A v.c. 



!»•» 



it® 



IKS 



SO 



HARKNESS 



+ f*3> 



£ 



AS 






"We don't do that sort of thins* at Presbyterian . 











■;;-r- ; 
























Quotes 

Dr. George 
How's third, 


Perera: 
er . . . 


"Hello Bill, er . . . John, 
first year treating you?" 


er 




Dave. 












^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


















Hypermitotil 
Process!! 




My God! My blood! 



Remember: 

Dr. Vicale's smile 



Maybe it's upside down, Bords 





Don" 




Gee. The low power's been crappy ever 
since Parisitology. 



5 



o 

U 



O 

Z 



o £ 

< s 

o = 

P - 

.•. f" g 

Si a ~ 

o fc< o 




Quotes: 

Dr. WEINER: "Put away your notebooks. 
This won't be on any exams." 




Well, it was like this. 
There was no moon 
the night I was born . 



Case of the page #2 (see pg. 124) 



going fast 








White man's burden . . . hrmpf! 



Ve-r-r-y interesting!; 



Prophesy: 

ART BROWN will retire and begin collecting social security 
after three years in practice. 















Don't, Howie! She's trying to get better. 





Remember: 

Dr. Bradley's smile 



Case of the page #3 




Quote: 

DR. CHARLES PERERA: "Gentlemen, this lady 
is my best patient." 






116 



* 




Listen, Ellie. 
I'm not going 
for honors. 




Well that should he eold enough. 





Quote: 

JOHN ESPOSITO (to Dr. Osserman): "Immunoelectrophoresis? 
If vou've seen one, you've seen them all" 



Now listen, if you cover for me this 
week, and you get someone . . . 




Remember: 

Going to Sloan's in your white jacket and getting 
asked where the canned foods are. 



117 




Now let's see. This goes . 



Spiritus Fermenti 








I ii 




Remember: 

Summer vacations 



Quote: 

DR. SHAINESS: "Multiple organism is impossible. 
I never experienced it." 






Prophesy: 

DON QUEST will forsake a demanding neurosurgical 
practice to return to stunt flying off the Kittv Hawk. 



118 




Remember: 

"I enjoy being a girl" 

Candy 
"With a little bit of luck" 

Randy 
"Have a banana" 

Panda and Hamilton 
"The night thev invented champagne" 

Class of '70 







Que 



uote: 

MARTY PROVTNE: "When did you have 
vonr breast removed?" 
Patient: "Look again, honev." 





119 




1 



i 






&k^ 




It's a machinery murmur! 




Remember: 

8 Center and 9 Center 



Prophesy: 

HAROLD OSBORN will serve as president of 
the AMA. 




Music to 
sleep by 



120 



Shades of Krypton! 







Samuel Bard 

Samuel Bard — Waiting for an 
elevator 





Prophesy: 

P & S will get a new library. 




I remember when she was just a 
baby hospital 



Quote: 

DR. MERRITT: "No one will be displaced by the 
building program." 




121 



FOP. 



WITHOUT B£3aPED TO 

, CREED OftO!XO = 

SUPPORTS^ sr 






Prophesy: 

CANDY COOPER WALWORTH: 
Life will be EZ 




NAMES — Most popular: 

FIRST NAMES: Steph(v)en, John, William (6) 
LAST NAMES: Brown, Sondheimer, Kronenberg, 
Walworth (2) 



Frustrations, even 





NAMES — Middle names: 

Rim from Armistead and Audet to Zinser and Zubow, Leslie 
and Clyde being popular with 2 each and even a Whittemore 
and one Faith 





Splendor in the grass. 



NAMES - What are they hiding? 

T. Stephen Balch, G. Peter Dingeldein, I. Craig 
Henderson, S. David Lang, W. Bruce Lundberg, 
E. Baldwin Sell 








Four Seasons — Uptown 




Quote: 

EVEBYONE: "You mean Kohl with a 
C or Cole with a K?" 



Rather switch than fight 



NAMES — Nicknames: 

We have a Punky, Bif, Panda, Oz, Pookie, Win, Blackie 
and Boomer but not one Aescalepius. 



Home away from home 









What's wrong with this picture 



Quote: 

DR. BLANC: "I think we should keep the placenta and 
throw away the bebe." 



JBHBMgaWww'WlHdgag 




^■■■■■■nHOT^K 





What's this radical stuff? 




Matt, your mother called again. 






Prophesy: 

RANDY HOWE will meet an untimely demise when at 98 he i.< 
accidently trampelled by a passionate hoard of admiring prepubertal 
teenage female neurotics. 



124 




And all I said was, "Coolev, have a heart.' 





Throw a little gravy on it, dearie . . . they won't know 
the difference. 



CASE OF THE PAGE - ANSWERS 

# 1 Both wrong. As can be seen in adjacent 
film, this is a rare expanding token lesion. 

#2 Each to his own devices. 

#3 Worms. 



Prophesy: 

TONY PEPE and ART LIBERMAN will be well noted. 



Your dribbling was only fair, but I liked the way you passed 



fit 



-:t> 





Remember: 

Sticking with your part of the alphabet for two years 

Bridge of Sighs 



125 



INTERNSHIPS 



Peter C. Albro 

Harborview Medical Center 

Seattle, Washington 
Thomas S. Balch 

Los Angeles Countv 

U.S.C. Medical Center 

Los Angeles, California 
Kenneth G. Benoit 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 
Michael D. Berger 

Tucson Hospitals 

Medical Education Program 

Tucson, Arizona 
William L. Bergman 

Denver General Hospital 

Denver, Colorado 
Howard L. Blank 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York, New York 
John R. Bogdasarian 

University Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 
James Bordley, IV 

Marv Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Cooperstown, New York 
Richard C. Boucher 

Presbvterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Arthur S. Brown 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 
George C. Brown 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 
Frederick M. Brunn, Jr. 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 
Steven C. Buchanan 

Emory University Hospital-V.A. 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Peter P. Budetti 

San Francisco General 

San Francisco, California 
John Burks 

University of California Program 

San Francisco, California 
David A. Burton 

Massachusetts General 

Boston, Massachusetts 
Richard G. Carlson 

Lincoln Hospital 

New York, New York 
Daniel H. Carmichael 

Barnes Hospital 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Dennis A. Carson 

Universitv Hospital of 

San Diego County 

San Diego, California 
Bruce A. Cassidy 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 
Paul Chang 

New \ork-Memorial Hospital 

New York, New York 
David C. Charlesworth 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

Hanover, New Hampshire 
James Z. Cinberg 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, New York 
Stephen A. Cole 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 
Robert L. Combs 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Cooperstown, New York 
David M. Corcoran 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 
Alan W. Cross 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester, New York 
Philemon Dickinson 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 



Rotating 


Russell S. Dilley 




Surgery 




Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 






Cooperstown, New York 






Medicine 


George P. Dingeldein 

North Carolina Memorial 




Surgery 




-lospital 






Chapel Hill, North Carolina 






John L. Esposito 

St. Luke's Hospital 




Medicine 


Surgery 








New York, New York 








Ronald B. Fauer 




Surgery 


Mixed Surgery 


Los Angeles County 
U.S.C. Medical Center 
Los Angeles, California 








Gary N. Foulks 




Surgery 


Mixed Psychiatry 


University Hospital of 
San Diego County 
San Diego, California 






Surgery 


Jane Eliot Fried 




Pediatrics 


Roosevelt Hospital 








New York, New York 






Surgery 


Fred A. Furgang 




Mixed Anesthesia 


University of Miami Arfil. 


Hospitals 






Miami, Florida 






Surgery 


Eugene W. Goldwater 




Rotating Medicine 




New York Polyclinic Hospital 






New York, New York 






Medicine 


Neil F. Goodman 

Beth Israel Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 




Medicine 


Mixed 


Geoffrey M. Gratwick 

Harlem Hospital 
New York, New York 




Mixed Medicine 


Surgery 


Harry B. Greenberg 

Bellevue Hospital 
New York, New York 




Medicine 


Surgery 


Richard J. Gusberg 

Presbyterian Hospital 




Surgery 








New York, New York 






Medicine 


Paul F. Gustavson, Jr. 




Rotating 




San Francisco General He 


spital 






San Francisco, California 






Mixed Pediatrics 


Gordon P. Guthrie, Jr. 

Roosevelt Hospital 
New York, New York 




Medicine 


Medicine 


Matthew J. Guy 

Maimonides Hospital 
New York, New York 




Medicine 


Medicine 


William L. Hazard 

Rhode Island Hospital 
Providence, Rhode Island 




Mixed Medicine 


Pediatrics 


Karen K. Hein 




Pediatrics 




Bronx Municipal Hospital 


Center 






New York, New York 






Surgery 


Charles V. Helming 




Surgery 


Beth Israel Hospital 








Boston, Massacnusetts 






Medicine 


Craig I. Henderson 

Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 




Medicine 




Paul R. Hickey 




Surgery 


Medicine 


Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 








John P. Hoche 




Medicine 


Medicine 


Vanderbilt University Hospital 






Nashville, Tennessee 








Peter L. Hofmann 




Medicine 


Surgery 


Roosevelt Hospital 






New York, New York 








Edmund G. Howe, TV' 




Mixed Medicine 


Surgery 


Harlem Hospital 






New York, New York 








Edward C. Jones 




Surgery 


Mixed Medicine 


Roosevelt Hospital 
New York, New York 








Sally J. Kasparek 




Medicine 


Rotating Medicine 


Lenox Hill Hospital 






New York, New York 








Richard J. Kates 




Obstetrics 


Medicine 


Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Baltimore, Maryland 














Steve Kohl 




Pediatrics 


Pediatrics 


Bronx Municipal Hospital 
New York, New York 


Center 






Gretchen Kronenberg 




Pediatrics 


Surgery 


Massachusetts General Hospital 




Boston, Massachusetts 







Henry M. Kronenberg 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 
S. David Lang 

Harborview Medical Center 

Seattle, Washington 
Jonathan Leichtling 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, New York 
Florence C. Li 

St. Vincents Hospital 

New York, New York 
Arthur R. Liberman 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 
Stephen Lichtenberg 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 
Diane Lipson 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 
Danne R. Lorieo 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 
Walter B. Lundberg, Jr. 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 
John C. Madigan, Jr. 

Presbvterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Bam M. Massie 

Bellevue Hospital 

New York, New York 
William R. McFarlane, Jr. 

Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 

New York, New York 
Jonathan C. McMath 

Presbvterian Medical Center 

Denver, Colorado 
Robert S. Middleton 

North Carolina Memorial Hospital 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 
Peter H. Mover 

Presbvterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Gilbert H. Mudge, Jr. 

Presbvterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Tom R. Norris, Jr. 

San Francisco General Hospital 

San Francisco, California 
Roman Nowygrod 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Harold H. Osbom 

Lincoln Hospital 

New York, New York 
Michael F. Parrv 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Thomas H. Patterson 

University of Alabama Medical Center 

Birmingham, Alabama 
Anthony J. Pepe 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 
Linda F. Pessar 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 
Phillip K. Peterson 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 
Martha A. M. Provine 

Maimonides Hospital 

New York, New York 
Donald O. Quest 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 
William H. Ramsey 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 
Carol A. Raviola 

University of California Medical Center 

San Francisco, California 
Thomas A. Rice 

San Francisco General Hospital 

San Francisco, California 
William W. Richardson 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 
Caroline A. Riely 

Presbvterian Hospital 

New York, New York 



Medicine 


John S. Rodman 

New York-Memorial Hospital 
New York, New York 


Medicine 


Rotating 


Ronald N. Rothenberg 

Children's Hospital 
Denver, Colorado 


Pediatrics 


Surgerv 


Karen A. Sarnoff 


Pediatrics 


Bronx Municipal Hospital Center 






New York, New York 




Mixed Medicine 


Bernard P. Schachtel 

Yale-New Haven Medical Center 
New Haven, Connecticut 


Pediatrics 


Medicine 


Robert M. Schmidt 

University Hospital of 
San Diego County 


Medicine 


Medicine 


San Diego, California 






E. Baldwin Self, Jr. 


Surgery 




Roosevelt Hospital 




Mixed Medicine 


New York, New York 






Stephen Q. Shafer 


Medicine 




Harlem Hospital 




Surgery 


New York, New York 




Mark I, Singer 


Surgery 




Presbvterian-St. Luke's Hospital 




Medicine 


Chicago, Illinois 






Samuel G. Siris 


Medicine 




Mount Sinai Hospital 




Surgery 


New York, New York 




Henry M. Sondheimer 


Pediatrics 




Colorado Medical Center 




Medicine 


Denver, Colorado 
Judith M. Sondheimer 

Colorado Medical Center 


Pediatrics 


Psychiatry 


Denver, Colorado 




Richard M. Spiegel 


Surgery- 




Presbyterian Hospital 




Rotating 


New York, New York 




Alan J. Spotnitz 

Beth Israel Hospital 


Surgery 






Surgery 


Boston, Massachusetts 




Gordon A. Starkebaum 


Rotating 




Harborview Medical Center 




Medicine 


Seattle, Washington 






William A. Tansey, HI 


Medicine 




St. Luke's Hospital 




Medicine 


New York, New York 




Michael L. Tapper 


Mixed Pediatrics 




San Francisco General Hospital 




Mixed Surgery 


San Francisco, California 
James L. Taylor 

Presbvterian Hospital 


Medicine 


Surgery 


New York, New York 




Alan D. Tice 


Medicine 




Roosevelt Hospital 




Pediatrics 


New York, New York 






Richard S. Tindall 


Surgery 




University of Minnesota Hospitals 




Medicine 


Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Ronald Wallach 

Presbvterian Hospital 
New York, New York 


Medicine 


Surgery 




Candace C. Walworth 


Rotating 




Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 




Medicine 


Hanover, New Hampshire 






Edward Z. Walworth 


Rotating 




Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 




Medicine 


Hanover, New Hampshire 
Olin L. West 

Harlem Hospital 


Rotating 


Medicine 


New York, New York 




Anthony D. Whittemore 


Surgery 




Presbyterian Hospital 




Mixed Medicine 


New York, New York 
Mark A. Wightman 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 


Rotating 


Surgery 


Cooperstown, New York 
Thomas M. Woodcock 

New York-Memorial Hospital 


Medicine 


Medicine 


New York, New York 
Keith A. Wrigley, Jr. 

Strong Memorial Hospital 


Medicine 






Surgery 


Rochester, New York 




Zvetan N. Zakov 


Surgery 




Presbyterian Hospital 
New York, New York 




Rotating 




Andrew W. Zimmerman 


Pediatrics 




University of Michigan Affil. Hospital 




Medicine 


Ann Arbor, Michigan 
Alan E. Zuckerman 

Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Baltimore, Mayland 


Pediatrics 


Medicine 





LOOKING BACK ON THE CHAMPAGNE CLASS 



The Class of 1970 is made up of people who have spent much of their time 
turning corners and straddling watersheds. Most of us went to secondary school 
when people in their teens were primarily concerned with being neatly dressed 
and attending the right college. The drug scene was beer. Most of us managed to 
get out of college just before activism and social awareness became fashionable. 
Coeducation was something practiced only at state universities and drugs were some- 
thing used by a few Dekes down the street. One entered the Dean's office by invita- 
tion only and the best known negro on campus was usually a soccer player from 
Gambia'. In medical school the social and fashion revolutions have caught up with 
us, but once again we are about to miss out — for we are departing from Colum- 
bia immediately prior to the full implementation of the most sweeping changes to 
occur at P&S since its founding. An attempt is now being made to make a Colum- 
bia medical education responsive to individual needs and relevant to modern clin- 
ical practice, and we are not really a part of this wide-ranging reform. We are the 
last doctors of the old school, just as we were the last of the gentlemen scholars. 
We seem to stand always between the old and the new; forced to abandon the old 
and yet not really partaking of the new. In one sense we are cheated out of the 
fullness of either, for it is difficult to be very enthusiastic about forms which have 
already been pronounced obsolete and junkable. On the other hand, this unusual 
intermediate position gives the members of our class a rather unique perspective 
on the change from old to new. We alone have seen some of both. 

If a volume such as this — the work of many interested hands — can be said to 
have specific purposes, one such must certainly be to serve as an example of and a 
chronicle for some of the changes which have taken place during our stay at med- 
ical school. The principal national event of the late sixties has clearly been the 
ascendance of the student class to a position of action and influence long held by 
similar young people in other countries. The willingness on the part of the young 
people of this country to accept and utilize this position and the reaction of the 
non-young to this development constitute the major conflicting forces we have 
seen at odds during the last four years. What past changes have become, we have 
seen and indeed been; what future changes will be, we shall see and eventually 
become. 

On the local scene, it is heartening to see an aged institution such as Columbia 
P&S adding flexibility and imagination to a basically sound educational program. 
That the College appears to be no longer much of an innovator, but at times a 
somewhat reluctant follower is less than heartening. But at least there is change 
afoot. There is movement. And if the medical college can bestir itself in these 
matters may we not hold out hope for further changes — some of which are long 
overdue. Perhaps someday the Hospital will shake itself loose from the unseen 
and unsympathetic men into whose hands it has placed its affairs, abandon its 
policy of aggrandizement, and begin to live its motto. Perhaps real leadership will 
in the near future be marshalled at the Medical Center, and the precipitous de- 
cline we have all worried over will cease. It may even be that the Medical Center 
will one day be looked upon by people in this immediate area as a truly caring 
and wholly beneficial associate in the drive for community health. Once move- 
ment has begun nearly anything is possible. You pays your money and you takes 
your chance. 

Richard G. Carlson 



129 



1970 YEARBOOK STAFF 



EDITORS 



Richard G. Carlson 



Samuel G. Siris 




^fc %^ 



^ 



r 





k 



Gordon A. Starkebaum 





PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Gordon A. Starkebaum 
Elizabeth Wilcox 

Honorary Staff Member 



Mark A. Wightman 




130 



STAFF 



Paul Chang 



William A. Tansey, III 
John M. Burks 
George P. Dingeldein, Jr. 
Robert M. Schmidt 



CONTRIBUTORS 

Karen Kramer Hein 
Edmund G. Howe, III 
James Bordley, IV 
Henry M. Kronenberg 
Harold H. Osborn 




Alan W. Cross 
Richard M. Spiegel 
Soren D. Lang 
Paul F. Gustavson, Jr. 
Danne R. Lorieo 



They also served 
Caroline A. Riely 
Mary Starkebaum 
Sims Foulks 



IN APPRECIATION 
The yearbook staff extends thanks to all those who contributed to 
this volume. Deserving special acknowledgement are: 

— parent and faculty sponsors and our advertising patrons 

— Andy Murro of the American Yearbook Company for his 
ever available counsel 

—Mr. Tapio of Roger Studios for the excellent senior 
photographs 

— Mrs. Eileen Daly of the registrar's office for invaluable 
reference 

— the Public Relations Office of Presbyterian Hospital for 
abundant materials 

— the P&S and Bard Hall information desks for getting the 
mail through 

— the enduring spouses of the beleaguered staff 




"What more can I say?" 

131 



FA CULTY 



SPONSORS 



Faculty 

Dr. David L. Andrews 

Dr. Arthur J. Antenucci 

Dr. Henry Aranow, Jr. 

Dr. Arnold L. Bachman 

Dr. Daniel C. Baker 

Dr. John M. Baldwin 

Dr. Harold G. Barker 

Dr. Milos Basek 

Dr. A. L. Loomis Bell, Jr. 

Dr. William A. Blanc 

Dr. Sidney Blumenthal 

Dr. Frederick O. Bowman 

Dr. Stanley Bradley 

Dr. Ellen Regan Brown 

Dr. Harold W. Brown 

Dr. Howard G. Bruenn 

Dr. Stanley M. Bysshe 

Dr. G. A. Carden, Jr. 

Dr. Charles Leigh Christian 

Dr. James W. Correll 

Dr. Stuart Cosgriff 

Dr. Bard Cosman 

Dr. Andre F. Cournand 

Dr. George F. Crikelair 

Dr. E. C. Curnen, Jr. 

Dr. George L. Curran 

Dr. Douglas A. Damrosch 

Dr. Robert C. Darling 

Dr. Felix DeMartini 

Dr. A. G. Devoe 

Dr. R.H.E. Elliot, Jr. 

Dr. Paul D. Ellner 

Dr. Carl R. Feind 

Dr. Marie D. Felix 

Dr. Charles A. Flood 

Dr. Andrew G. Frantz 

Dr. Vincent J. Freda 

Dr. Henry Clay Frick, II 

Dr. Harry W. Fritts 

Dr. Alexander Garcia 

Dr. Sawnie R. Gaston 

Dr. Arnold P. Gold 

Dr. Dewitt S. Goodman 

Dr. Dean Grandin 

Dr. S. Ashby Grantham 

Dr. Albert W. Grokoest 

Dr. Frederich P. Herter 

Dr. Robert B. Hiatt 

Dr. Edgar M. Housepian 



Dr. Calderon Howe 
Dr. Robert M. Hui 
Dr. Alfred Jaretski, III 
Dr. Mary Jane Jesse 
Dr. Sven Kister 
Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb 
Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld 
Dr. John H. Laragh 
Dr. John K. Lattimer 
Dr. Edgar Leifer 
Dr. O. Robert Levine 
Dr. John N. Loeb 

Sponsors 

Dr. Niels, L. Low 

Dr. James R. Malm 

Dr. Alfred M. Markowitz 

Dr. George Melcher 

Dr. George R. Merriam, Jr. 

Dr. H. Houston Merritt 

Dr. Robert Michels 

Dr. Jay I. Meltzer 

Dr. David B. Moore 

Dr. Charles S. Neer, II 

Dr. S. H. Ngai 

Dr. Mero Nocenti 

Dr. C. P. O'Connell 

Dr. Elliot F. Osserman 

Dr. Charles A. Perera 

Dr. George A. Perera 

Dr. Phillip Polatin 

Dr. J. Lawrence Pool 

Dr. Milton R. Porter 

Dr. Charles A. Ragan, Jr. 

Dr. Frederick R. Randall 

Dr. Harry M. Rose 

Dr. Saul Sanders 

Dr. Grant Sanger 

Dr. Thomas V. Santulli 

Dr. Malcolm H. Schvey 

Dr. Daniel Sciarra 

Dr. William B. Seaman 

Dr. David Seegal 

Dr. Hamilton Southworth 

Dr. Harold F. Spalter 

Dr. Charles F. Stewart 

Dr. Frank E. Stinchfield 

Dr. Richard J. Stock 

Dr. F. C. Symonds 

Dr. John V. Taggart 



Dr. Donald F. Tapley 
Dr. W. Duane Todd 
Dr. Wolfgang Tretter 
Dr. Ralph J. Veenema 
Dr. Carmine T. Vicale 
Dr. Jules Waltner 
Dr. S. C. Wang 
Dr. A. R. Wertheim 
Dr. Robert T. Whitlock 
Dr. Walter A. Wichern 
Dr. Philip D. Wiedel 
Dr. Herbert B. Wilcox, Jr. 
Dr. Susan Williamson 
Dr. James A. Wolff 
Dr. Robert Wylie 
Dr. Hans Zinnser 

PARENTS 

Parents 

Mr. Arthur Dean Berger 

Dr. Robert Michael Bogdasarian 

Mr. James Bordley, III 

Mr. Philip Parks Burks 

Mr. Albert Gunnar Carlson 

Mrs. Libby Cassidy 

Dr. C. William Chang 

Mr. Louis John Esposito 

Mr. Sidney Saul Farrer 

Mr. and Mrs. Rubin Gay 

Mr. John Newbold Hazard 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon P. Helming 

Mr. Daniel Robinson Howe 

Mr. Robert Howe Kernohan 

Dr. and Mrs. Irving Kramer 

Mr. Daniel Lichtenberg 

Dr. George Lipson 

Mr. Walter B. Lundberg 

Mr. Earl Rudolph Monson 

Mr. Frank William Parry 

Mrs. Edith Maslowski Raviola 

Dr. and Mrs. Sydney M. Siris 

Mr. E. Henry Sondheimer 

Dr. Milton B. Spiegel 

Dr. Hyman Spotnitz 

Mr. Norman V. Starkebaum 

Dr. George Irving Tice 

Mr. Olin L. West. Jr. 

Mr. A. Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Moses A. Zuckerman 



we extend apologies to any sponsors whose contribution 
arrived after this section went to press. 



132 



2 famll. _ 
Wallc to lubway. Urge Income 

jT LE 9-H6 

G-3 btdrm Colonlal-lft HN>- 

ir; nr schls-ihops + short walk 
ay $32.500 IN 3-734? 



S 2-FAM BRICK 

us owner+studlo apt. $42,990 

39-06 UNION ST FL 3 

3— 2-familv detached. S rms 

ir oar, 50xt75. Choke Location. 

Jai: 3S3-00a0 



HOU.I5 HILLS — $46,500. Set midst 
towering shade trees. This det 2-sty 
side hall colonial represents exc.'ii vatue. 
6 tremendous rms + lge lalousled Fla. 
rm. 2\i baths, gar, oversized plot. Low 
taxes. New kit, lint extras. Kiv with us. 

Dear Prosoectivt Home Owners 1 Please 
call or come In to register your needs. 
Our office is lumping. Here the results 
pfove that we try harder. 

RUTH COHEN 



1 89-1 S UNION TPKE 



G (Mitchell Gardens) 51.900 
Irm ranch. 2 bths, 2-car gar 
, extras. Broadway. IN 1-9000 
G All Brick, 6 rms, gar, 
. fin bsmnt $32.9-50. 
». Day R E 9-16 64 

S NO I bdrm Drt, Ji , tins, 

I. plot, fin bsmt. $42. SW. 
188-03 Northern Blvtf 939-0100 



ILLS GDNS Vic. $55,000 

its det. Tudor with 8 rooms, 
ns, ; j baths, garage, garden. 

ANE REALTY 

JEENS 8LVD BO 8-3500 

iUB STA FOREST HILLS 



479-1 880 

JAM EST-Holllswood-reasonably priced 

at $42,90Pxhdrming New England Salt- 
box, 4 bedrms, 2 bths + den + mud 
im, F/6, Gar, oversize plot. Wm. E 

Cook, OL 8-8420, 

JAMAICA HILLS 2 block INP detached 
1 fam, 10 rms. 40x100 lot, "2 car gar, 
al l mo d . $34 , 000 5hik VI 6-8585 - 
KEW Gdns Hills 7 yr young 2 fam. 
brie. 5 & 5 + walk-in. Excl cond, 
beaut street, od income, nr everything 
Mid Ui ;.. Call owner LI 4-9834 or BO 

ESto: 

KEW Garden Hills— semi-attached 6 rms, 

i bths, cent'l air cond, fin bsmt, ex' 

tras. $30,000. 461-0629. 



>T HILLS 



$40,000 



Jet 2 fam, 3'S. Vi rentable 
it-walk exp sub EXCLUSIVE 

HUB REALTY 

EENS BLVD. Al (3rd 
UK TW 1-2 



ST HILLS, REGO PARK Vic 
ses & Apts for sal, or rent 
TREE T CO BO 3 -7300 

HILLS BRICK 142,500 

TO 2 kit 2 btn tin bsmt gar 
70-53 Austin St BO 8-6360 



LITTLE NECK 40S 

SPRAWLING RANCH 

Just Ifs'ed! Florida bound owner offers 
beautiful & immac your.g home. Livrm, 
spacious dining area, mod eat-in kitch, 3 
bedrms, lVa baths. Lovely fin bsmt with 
family rm, kitch, bar, vi btn. Att gar. 
Tastefully landscaped, 60x100 plot. You'll 
be proud to own this. 

LITTLE NECK REALTY 

254-13 Northern Blvd 224-0300 

CLOSED EASTER SUNDAY 



lis His— Lge Side Hall 
vJE SLATE CAPE COD 

bdrms-216 bths, 2 car gar, 
nite-club bsmt, lo taxes, loc 

;.-.".;q O.vntT 479-1167. 



i beach, Llndenwood Sectn. 
m saiid brick 35x100 plot, 7V2/ 
large rooms, 3 private en- 
5 fully tiled baths, eat in 
dishwashers, 24x18 wood pan- 
room, sun veranda- all brass 
, 6+ 3'/z rooms now rented 
month Income. All conven 
all owner, Vi 3-6063. 



MIDDLE VILLAGE 

Excellent condition, 3-bdrm all brick 
semi-atlached bungalow, ideally lecated, 
2 full baths. 220 line, 4 air-cond'rs, $450 
taxes, burglar alarm, fibreglas awnings 
front & rear, fibreglas fence, landsc, 
ly redec, dishwasher, new roof & 
ler, 16 yean young, plaster walls, 
fin bsmt, 16x28 redwood pool 135,^3. 

DE 5-7U27. 

NEPONSIT BRICK HOUSE, ocean block 
9 rms, 3 bths, maid's rm & bth, basmnt 
& bth, Cabana & bth, gar, $85,000 
GR 4-0412 



BCH, 5Va PCt mtQ, 48x100 Cor 
rnch 4 bdrms, cent A/C. 
many extras S43.SO0. 545-6344 



tO BEACH, LINDENWOOD 

yrs, 3 bdrms,- 2- baths each, 
Itenv extras. 545,990. Ml 1-4568 



HTS— 2 fam brick home. 6'A, 
'■7 rms + gar. Gas heat. 5 years 
f once 557,990 

MURPHY HI 6-0100 

Roosevelt Ave. Jackson Hts. 



TS— 12-yr-old brick, 6% rms 
t, gar, terr, enclosed grds 
JWENS & G4ILLAR0. IL 7-4-f43 



rs, t fam 12 yr brick, 3 bdrms. 
5, fin bsmt, gar, grdn 529,900 
1, 75-20 Rsvlt Ave, OL 1-8972 



, ESTATES N $44.. „ 

Brick 8. Fieldstona Cape with 7 
ledrms, 2'A bths, large living 
p«'a<-e, full din rm, nite club 
vet bar; garage & much more, 

ESTATE N 548,500 

stion! Attractive Gross-Morton 
Tolonlal, 7 large rms, 3 bedrms 
j den, l'A baths, fin bsmt; 
fully equipped throughout. 

TATES 454-200 

David H. Btown 

6-30 UNION TURNPIKE 



Nr 1?9 St. $22,990 Immac 
rms, 2 bl INO, tree lined l 

ESTATES NO. Beaut 6 rm brk 
hall, Vh baths, excel cond, top 
a, reduced to $26,500. 
» 

kpDEN HILLS $30,990 lovely 
rick home, side hall, lVa baths 
basement, garage. 

iSTWOOD REALTY 

llside Ave JA 3-6015 



JAMAICA ESTATES. 

EXCLUSIVE 1 

Tudor brick bungalL 

bedrooms, 2Va bathl. .. 

2 car garage, -beamed cetlmg 

*e in living room. Approx 

ft of landscaped grounds 

subway. Excellent buy at onh 

~y appointment only please 

r HILDEGARDE CUNOW 

RY BROWN REALTOR 

ZO Un ion T pke, G R_?-2400 

Oversized att. brick side- 

3 bedrms. appliances + 

IG, NR SCH-LS LOW TAXES 
530,900 

ILLS, NEW OFFERING! Fabu 
brick caoe- custom built, 4 
baths, eat-In kitchen 2 fire- 
tlmate niteclub bsmt, 2 car 
rk-like grounds, .. . $47,500 

tv Brown Rltr. 



COMMACK OFFICE , $38,900 

Meticulous 8 rm Colonial on 1/3 acre. 
Featuring 4 master sire bdrms, beauti- 
ful den w/frnlc, Vh bins, 2 car gar. Hi- 
existing mtge, Exclusive with: 

FIRESIDE 

1158 E. Jericho Toke. Commack 

(516) 543-5100 



LAURELTON Georgia Peach 525,990 

new brk duplex, 6 is rms, IVi bths, 

garage. FLAME AX 1-7400 



COMMACK Smlthtown 4 bdrms. Hi 
ranch, 2Va bth, 2 car gar, wall/wal 

Ihruout, Dnld den, 20xd0 patio w/BBQ, 
Extras, Prin only 536,000- 5I6-363-9S44 



QUEENS VILLAGE 519,990 

All brick residence. Exquisite condition. 
Ideal locatn. Close to schools & subw 
bus. Lrge rms, modern-age kitch, 2 tone 
col tile bth, 20' living rm, sumptuous 
basement, ww carperg thruout. All ap- 
pliances included. Immed occupancy. 
Only $1,000 cash down. 

LONG ISLAND HOMES 
168-12 Hillside Ave, Jam. RE 9-7300 



QUEENS VILLAGE $25,990 

LEGAL 2-FAM. Decorated, w-w crptg. 
mod kits & bths, auto ht, gar. 52000 dn 
BUTTERLY & GREEN JA 6-* '"' 



REGO PARK 2 fam brk art 3'A down 
fii 3 uo fin bsmt S/S. Owner apt. 7 
fall bths. Asking LO $3Qs TW 9-7382 



RICHMOND HILL solid brick, 3 years, 
3 story, 5/3/+ 3 room apts, eat in 
kitchen, dishwasher, luminous ceilings, 
3 fully tiled baths, 6' vanity, all large 
rooms, closets galore. Now rented. In- 
come 5420 per month. Convenient to 
everything 6% mortgage. $38,500. Call 
ner, VI 3-6063 



ROSEDALE. 2 fam semi-det house, 
6 up, 3 down, 2-zone heating. Fenced. 
Good income. $36,990. AR 6-9002, 



ROSEDALE Ranch— 3 bedrooms'; 1^ 



sunnyside, brick 2 Family nr subway 
5 rms avail, —hi Inc & 2 gar $35,990 
Bway Affil 74 -22 BwaV J . H. N E 9-6869 
WOODS! DE — Our lovely home has grown 
too small only 3 br, Ir, fml dr, eat 
in kitch, fin bsmt Indry rm, lots of 
extras, all brk, semi det cor 50x100 
WA 5-1505 eves & weekends TW 9-0182. 



RENTALS — QUEENS 



FOREST HILLS Gardens, 9-room hou^e, 
7 bedrooms, garage, basement, subway, 

mmediate. <'-.":■ --. - O.'.-r- g.r, :i ■ 



ROSEOALE-DuPlex house; 6 rms, new 
Includes heat & hot water; $250 mo, 
DATA (5161 328-0222. 



Houses— Nassau-Suffolk 



AL&ERTSON-Wtieatiev Schls-bream Use. 
lg bdrms, 20x20 fam rm, fin bsmt Ex- 
elusive w/JOS M. MULLALY 516 FL 
4-0962. 



Amagansert — Walk to Ocean 

bdrm-2 bths, ranch-frnl-all apples- 



AMITYVILLE WATERFRONT - Cedai 

rnch, 3 bdrms, 1 Vi btre, frplc, en 
closed porch, gar, lge bulkheaded "lot 
S29,990. 

Closed Easter Sun. 
CONKLING 516 Li 1-1323 

5432 Merrick_R(j Massapenua, L' 

BABYLON W. 516,750, extreme low 
taxes, 2 bd, 1-story, 80x100, obi gar, 
bsmt, w/w carpet, s/s, wash mach, 
refrig & stove, walk to shop & ichls, 
1 mi R R, (516) MO 9-5029. 



BABYLON NO. 7 RM SPLIT 

3-4 bdrms, Vh baths, fenced, Indscpd. 
Panld bsmt, walk everything, extras. 
526,900. 516-586-0271; 212-334-0275 



area for 5th t 6th). 4 sparkling 
tiled baths, full basement, 2 car 
attached garage 
HEATED 40x25 FT POOL 



Exclusive Syosset Schools. Take over 
540,000 mortgage. Call tor early ap- 
pointment. Closed Easter Sunday. 



LA ROSA REALTY 

5)6 WA 2-3337 „ . . 
6324 Northern Blvd., East Norwich 
(Qpp__Roth ma n's Inn) 



ESTATES SECTION 

Cenrerhall colonial, Ivrm, Im burr 
fplce. dinrm, mod fam. size kitch, 
4 bdrms, 3 bths, fin bsmt, short « 
to station. Hi 5 pet. mtgt. Only 565, 

SHAKESPEARIAN COTTAC 



CEDAR HURST-Woodmere-Charmlng brk 

Coftnial, 5 bdrms, 2Va bths; lovely 

grounds. Top location. Only 543-900 

Deluxe 5 bdrm Ranch 1/3 ae $64,900 
SAM ROBERTS 516 FR 4-0550 



COMMACK-Ranch $28 r400 -Center Fover 
Entry, 9 Immac Rm + 5 Bdrm 2 Bth 
Units, Panld Den, Double Garage. Re- 
frig, Washer, Dryer, Dishwasher, W/W 
Carpeting. Exclusivel 

RANDOM 543-7900 



2Vj bths, 2 car gar, fin bsmt, HI 6 
mtge. Asking $79,500. 

Closed Good Friday £ Easter Sunt 
Will be ready to show you these 
elusive listings on Monday. 
THE ABOVE EXCLUSIVE LISTIN< 

MAY ONLY BE SEEN WITI 
TAYLOR-WARNER 

We are not affiliated with any ol 
office See our many exclusive listir 

01 7th St. Est 1919 516 PI 1-4 
GLEN COVE— Spacious Brick multl-le 
located top Quality community, well- 
uated on wooded Vi acre, tall tn-es o 
shade, living rm w/Roman bride fri 
wall, very modern kitchen, den v 
picture window over-looking garden : 
rounded marble patio, also tamilv 
w/half bath, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 2 c-t 

mmac, recently redecorated, $46, 

Goldberg Bros MLS Reaitc 

84 Glen St 516 CR 6-2 



COMMACK Blrchwd 3 Bdrm, lVa bth Col 
central A/C dwshr, w/w, trees, excel 

loc. S27.500. Owner 516-543-8775 



COMMACK, 3 bdrm Col, Indscped 1/3 a 
pnld den, cov'd patio, eat in kit, WW, 

6 aPPls, extras. $28,500. 516-368-6214 



COMMACK— 3 bdr Ranch Vi acr, spac 
ktch fin bsmt, fned bk vd; nr schl 
low tax?s. S2J.00n 543-1648 



DEER PARK Vh story 6 rms, 3 bdrms, 

full bth, encld porch 50x100 $20,000 

51 6-MO 7-B765 adj'g property avail 



IA MILLS nufll inuiu 

5 Bdrm Colonial 

STATELY & INVITING this matestic 
brick & cedar cntr hall Colonial on a 
beaut acre propty in the heart of true 
Dix Hills. 5 master size bedrms, 3 
woodburning brick frpl, 2-car att gar, 
huge bsmt, extras galore. Great home 
for the targe fam w discriminating taste. 
SEE THIS & STOP LOOKING! $43,990 

Huntington Homes 

(516) HA 3 3700 

West Jericho Toke 2 ml W of Rta 11 



GLEN COVE $5,000 BELOW MARK 
On stunning treed acreage. Just imas 
almost new immac 4-5 bdrm w/si 

less applncs & extras $37,. 

BARR 765 Glen St 516 OR 1-2 



E. HAMPTON-WATERFRONT 

yr round contemp firepl, 3 bdrms, 2 
bth. Cam ceil sky view S'AVo mtg 
539100 (516) 324-2753 or (212) 625-4224. 



EAST HAMPTON Waterfront yr round 
furn'd 3 bdrms, 2 bths, 100' ovt ech 
on 3 Mile Hbr. Master bdrm-sit'g rm 
24* window o'look'g Hbr, full bsmt 
applncs. S58,000 516 324-4233 



E. HAMPTON 2 ac on Georgica Pond 
restored 18th cent, farmhse 3 bdrms 
3rd fir skylite studio. Ask $115,000 516 
324-1 568; 212 PL 2-7557; YU 8-6876. 



E. HAMPTON— 3 bdrms, 1 bath, frol 
heat, furn, Vi acre, pvt beach + 27 
Owens boat. 526,000 „ ,„,„„, 

RED LANTERN . 516 324-1122 



EAST HAMPTON. Waferfr & waterv 
homes 3-4 bdrms, on acre & swim pool. 
ETHEL L. MURRAY (516) 324-0941 



E. ISLIP— Sacrifice sale 3 bdrm split 
level cor property nr Great So. Bav 
S36,S00. Many extras. 516-277-9922. 



EAST MEADOW— immac 3 bdrm, 2 bth 
split eat-in kitch, formal dinrm, panld 
fam rm- ovrszd lot, many extras. Walk 
schls, pool & park. $39,900. By appt 
(516) 538-2973 



EAST MEADOW Lakevllle split; tare 
over high mtge, no closing fees; only 
$8500 cash; 8 newly decorated rms, 2 
baths, EXPRESS 516 IV 1-8S0Q. 



E. MEADOW Broker-Unusual modern spin 

ovely rooms paneled den basement 

_ar, all extras, hi mtge-onlv $39,990 

PURITAN f5!6) IV 3-7900 



E MDW— S2B,500 Brk cent hall. Blrchwd 
4 bdrm, dinrm, bsmt, applncs. extras. 
$3,500 csh-GI mtg. Klar 516-PE 5-1700 



E MDW. $22,990 Randall Ranch 4 bd 
rm. Irg grnds, low taxes. Ccnvemon' 



EAST NORWICH-4 bdrm 3 bth, plaster 
walls, slooed beam & plank ccilgs. 
fplc, 15x26 plavrm w/bar, fin bsmt, 
2 car art gar. Oversize Vi ac wooded 
plot. Many extras. Also suitable for 
profesnl. Principals only $50,000. 516 
922-3BI2. 



EAST QUOGUE waterfront ranch, 4 rms 
& bth, heat, furn'd, 14' boat. 516-RA 

3-1585 wkends; 212 HA 4-4237 wkd a ys 
EAST W1LLIST5N WHEATLEY~SCH"CS 
8 rms. spac brk split, 1/3 ac. Traffic 
free str near Golf Course & all trans. 
Complete deluxe landscp. 559,500. 

VALENTINE Agency Est 1915 

143 Mineola Blvd, Mineola 746-7200 



n a wooded park-like setting. It 
jv/log burning fplce, dinrm, heated 
porch, den, playrm, lae kitch, 5 bdr 



GLEN COVE-lmmaculate-4 bdrms 
3 yr young Col, in prestige area, 
schools. House has centr air-cond, : 
baths, lge liv rm w/frplc, panel eal 
kitch & den, din rm, 2-car g3r & mi 
more H' 6 net, mtge. Price Lo 5( 
wkdvs (2121 WO 6-0231 ; Sat, I 
(516) 671-7280. 



GLEN COVE. Luxury home, full 
charm, prestige area, custom bit, ! 
estate sate, a steal at $32,000. 
GLEN HEAD. 9 rms, fpl, big 
hi mtge, only $39,900 for fast sale 
RANGER REALTY (516) OR 6-90O 



Glen Cove Roxbury $27,00 

2-3 bdrm Cape stucco & shingle, 2 



GLEN COVE— CUL-DE-SAI 

. bdrm IV2 bths— fam rm— din in 
S35.000. OF? 6-5335 aft j PM. 

GLEN COVE Colonial charm, 3 t 
rooms, slate roof, tivrm, lir«pl, 
baths, S32,000. 
Exclusive with Mcehan 516 OR o-l 



GLEN COVE Conven unlet St Col S31, 
4 bdrm 2 bths din rm fam rm $830 
GIL REALTY Greenvale 5U-I84-0 



GLEN COVE S53, 

His Garden Was His Delight" 

TR|.GLEN_Realtors 516/671_-3 

GLEN Cv— Red. from $37,500 O 



GLEN HEAD, 5EA CLIFF OR NEAF 
HAPPY EASTER 
YOUNG RANCH 

3 Bdrm. den, 2 bth. Dinrm $39, 
FIVE BEDROOM SPREAO 
Contemporary ranch, 3 bth $45,00' 
Young colonial. High mort $46,50 
Gracious older ranch. Vac 565,00 
■ CLOSED EASTER SUNDAY 
FOR REAL ESTATE SEE JOHN 

MACCRATE 

212 SEA CLIFF AV OR 6-14 



A 
D 
V 

E 

R 

T 
I 

S 
E 




EXCLUSIVE MULTIPLE LISTING 

Beautiful center hall, choice area, 
bed, 25 ft. pan'ld fam rm/frgl, 25 
rm, seo din rm, many extras $55/ 

JOSEPHINE RUSSO 

673 Glen Cove Ave, Glen Head OR 6-2 



GLEN HEAD ONE AC 

CUSTOM RANCHES 1 ':OLOWIALS 

$62,000 & UP 516 OR 1-0 



GREAT NECK BETTER HOW 

Owners Move-Your Gain 

EXCLUSIVE. Pretty as a picture cut 
bit Col. Beautifully shrubbed pit. Ev 
rm off wide C.H., 4 oversized bdrms 
pnld den. Quality thruout. Possibilit 
for prof'l set-up. Lovely private p 
ares. Asking $70's. 

RUSSELL GARDENS 

VERY 1ST SHOWING-WOW! Anol 
C.H. Col. in move-in cond. 4 fam. b 
rms & maids, mod Irg kitch, laun 
on 1st fir. Fin, nsmnt/wet bar & p 
rm. Prima are*. Young & lmmacul! 
Only $4S0's. 

KINGS POINT 

EXCLUSIVE Ranch. Unusual law 
Wide CH 3 fam bdrm, enormous stu 
den with bubbles of natural light. I 
mod ktch, airy, brire in beaut tTeed s 

TOPS-ALL, Realtors 



GREAT NK'S 
445 Northern 



INDEPENDENT BROK 
Blvd. G.N. SI6-466-3I 



E 

N 

T 
S 




Cfje g&coctation of tfje Alumni 

College of Physicians anb burgeons 

Columbia ©nibcrsitp 

630 West 168th Street, Hew Yot\.KT- 10032 
Telephones (212) 579-3498 or 3804 




The Association of the Alumni of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons welcomes each member of the 
Class of 1970 as a member of our Association, and 
extends its best wishes for your personal happiness and 
professional success. 

We would like to be able to keep you informed 
concerning events at the School and in the lives of your 
classmates and other alumni. Many of you will have 
several changes of address in the next few years and it 
would be helpful if you would keep us informed of such 
changes. 



Irving A. Sarot, '32 
President 



134 



CONGRATULATIONS 

and 

BEST WISHES 

to 

THE CLASS of 1970 



from 

The Manager and Staff 

of Bard Hall 



135 



mw \ / ' .'■: I . / 
SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION 

4090 BROADWAY (AT 173rd ST.;, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10032 (212) 795-6200 



MICROSCOPES, MICROTOMES 

METALLURGICAL AND 

LABORATORY 

EQUIPMENT 

Authorized Distributors: 

American Optical 

Bausch and Lomb 

E. Leitz 



REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 Broadway, Corner 169th St. 

New York City 

Air Conditioned 



HEIGHTS 

Camera Center 

The Leading Brands In Photographic 

Equipment And Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality in Photo Finishing 

Done On Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 

New York, N.Y. 10032 

WA-3-3400 



WA. 7-5 7( 



M. CITARELLA, Inc. 



WINES AND LIQUORS 

Visit Our Wine Cellar 



3915 BROADWAY near 164th STREET 
NEW YORK 10032, N. Y. 



THE MEDICAL CENTER 
BOOKSTORE 



EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 

TO 

THE CLASS OF 1967 



VOTE 


ONE HOUR MARTINIZING 

Free Pick-Up and Deliver)' 

The Most in Dry Cleaning 

4083 Broadway (172nd Street) 

WA-8-9937 


for 
OTTO 


SYD'S DENTIST SHOP 

31 West Main Street, Penns Grove, New Jersey AX 9-1096 
"Teeth drilled while you wait." 


— a paid political announcement brought 
to you by the Dean Search Committee - 


NELSON'S 

KOSHER DELICATESSEN AND 

RESTAURANT 



CATERERS 

Home Cooked Lunches 

and Full Course Dinners 

Wines — Liquors — Cocktails Served 

4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 

WA-3-9606 



Best Wishes 
For a Rewarding and Illustrious Career 



ROGER STUDIOS 

PORTRAITS OF DISTINCTION 

4143 Broadway 

New York, New York 10033 

WA 7-7894 

We Keep Negatives of Your Photographs on File 

for Many Years After Graduation 



LOOK- 



OSPITAL SUPPLY. INC. 

4086 BROADWAY AT 173RD STREET ■ NEW YORK. N.Y. 10032 
(212) 781-8500 



Featuring: 

• Equipment & Supplies 
For The Doctor & His Patient 

• Complete Office Design 

Service 



Positions 

still 
Available 



1970 Yearbook Staff 



COURTESY CARDS 

Medical Center Pharmacy 

Jacob Kaplan, F.A.C.A. 
4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th Sts. 

WA. 31258 
Specialists In Prescription Compounding 



TROPICAL 


Expert Tailor & Cleaners 

J. FRENK 

230 Fort Washington Avenue WA-7-3884 
All kinds of Alterations 
Satisfaction guaranteed 


GARDENS 


MANHATTAN UNIFORM CENTER 

4036 Broadway at 170th St. 

"Medical Uniforms To Fit All Needs" 

Telephone LO 8-9130 


ON BROADWAY 

Bet. 169 and 170 Sts. 

WA-3-8918 


WA. 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 
JEWELER 

Electronically Tested Watch Repair 

4009 Broadway at 168th Street 

New York 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 



What to give the girl who has everything 



Penicillin 



in handy ointment or suppository form. 



139 



We speak doctor. 
Present and future, 



At Chemical Bank, we can assist in your present and future 
personal and professional financial plans. With our complete range 
of services, we can meet your every banking need. 

When you first start your practice, we can help you with 
our Professional Finance Plan and a Checking Account. 

Later on, as your practice grows, we can help you with our 
Professional Billing Service. Or one of our many Personal 
Trust Services. 

So let us help. Stop in at any of our more than 140 offices 
and ask for our booklet entitled, "Professional Finance Plan." 



Chemical Bank 

We do more for your money. 



MEMBER F.D.I. C. 



140 



? out of 4 P & S men recommend 



CH- 



OH 





C 5^"m) 



AT 



H 3 C CH 



for pain relief 




WA. 3-2424 "Say It With Flowers" 

Medical Center Flower Shop 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

ARTISTIC DECORATION FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

The Flower Shop Nearest The Medical Center 

"We Telegraph Flowers" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 



LUIGI'S RESTAURANT & BAR 

Washington Heights 1 Leading 

Italian Restaurant 

1 148 St. Nicholas Ave. 4199 Broadway 

167- 168th Streets Corner 178 St. 

WA-3-9216-7 WA-8-9601 



Tel: LO. 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

NICK TSAKIRIDIS 

4021 Broadway New York 10032 

Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 



Pain Reliever 

3 out of 4 

P & S men Recommend 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 

Specialist 

INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

90 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

10016 

Telephone: 682-2130 



H 
I 
H- C 

I 
H 



H 
I 
C -H 

OH 



SELECT PHOTO 

1229 ST. Nicholas Avenue 
WAdsworth 3-3698 



Compliments of 

Greco Bros. 



WAdsworth 7-4000 

Silver Palm Restaurant 

4001 Broadway cor. 168 St. 



Como Pizza, Inc. 

Hot & Cold Heros 
We Deliver 4035 Broadway & 170 St. 

NICK and ANGELO 



24 HOUR SERVICE ON COIOR 




MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3934 Broadway ( 165th St. ) 
Near Medical Center 

Phone LO. 8-8590 

Special Oiicqi/nfj fo Sfudenfi 



"See us for liquor first" 

UPTOWN 

Wines & Liquor Store 

Incorporated 

4033 Broadway at 170 Street 

New York. New York. 10032 

LO-8-2100 



Armory Restaurant 

FINE AMERICAN-ITALIAN FOOD 

Newly Redecorated Dining Room 

401 1 Broadway bet. 168th & 169th Sts. 

Wa. 3-9034 



Compliments of 

Cory Quality Cleaning Corp. 



POLLACK'S BAR-B-QUE 

Bar-b-que Chicken & Ribs 

Fried chicken, fish, shrimps, salads, dinners 

4029 1 /: Broadway WA8-9664 




Trick or Fick? 



143 



WO 






> 



\ 



-T * 



jf 



144 










tt$Nte**«*v 



ii!££S®*^****s»**e 












^ i*!^ 



^? 




.-i^^^-^JW^^^'r--* ■.-*-.>*-'. : • ■■, ,-. _